ABDUL-JALIL: Lecturer, Presenter, Sports and Entertainment Law, Marketing, Branding

ABDUL-JALIL- the First “SUPER AGENT”

“In another religion they honor people who serve like you with Sainthood!”” – Economics Professor Adeel Malik,Oxford
University, England and World Renowned News Expert Commentator, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation.

“GOD sent me an ANGEL!”” – Hammer, speaking about Abdul-Jalil.

 
“Jalil, YOU ARE A TZADIK (SAINT)!”– Barry Barkan, Live Oak Institute and

  Ashoka Fellow at Ashoka Foundation:Innovators for the Public

“I thank God for you and for bringing you into my life and for the ministry you have been given to help the people of God!”– Pastor L. J. Jennings, Kingdom Builders Christian Fellowship, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and AMWF

ABDUL-JALIL: GENIUS, CALLED “BOY WONDER!!”

ABDUL-JALIL GENIUS- BOY WONDER!!

“Imaginative, foresighted, some pretty impressive credentials. His I.Q. QUALIFIES HIM AS A GENIUS.“ UPI

Only person to graduate from University of California, Berkeley in 2.5 years and achieve letters in three academic disciplines of Business Administration, Educational Psychology, and Sociology; ~ Completed now mandatory 4 year Walter A. Haas School of Business Degree in 15 months, ~ Took and passed one full year class load in one college academic quarter!,~ “Recognized for Genius I.Q”- UPI and AP., ~As a senior founded a Minority Scholar-Athlete Admissions Program at U. C. Berkeley, ~Had completed 1.5 years of 2 year MBA program before entering Stanford Graduate School of Business as a result of Undergraduate Business Degree from Cal Berkeley, Upon completing Cal he took the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) – a mandatory test to enter top Master and PHD Doctorate Programs in Business and scored so high ABOVE 710, that the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and Haas Administration thought it impossible to achieve without cheating! He was then asked (required) to take the test again under strict surveillance and supervision in a private room with just him and TWO ETS test administrators! To EVERYONE’s chagrin, the results of the second supervised test revealed he scored HIGHER than the first test!

Jalil with one of his Rolls Royces

As President and CEO of Superstar Management since 1971, the first African-American in this field, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim has a tremendous
wealth of experience in all aspects of business and personal management, contract drafting and negotiations, and performed all arbitrations of salary grievances and contract disputes for all professional sports and entertainment clients with unprecedented legal and historical results. He negotiates and drafts all agreements for all publishing, merchandising and licensing; commercial advertisements and product endorsements; corporate sponsorships and affiliations; motion picture, television, radio and personal appearances. He was the first “SUPER AGENT”, CREATED the Profession of Sports/Music/Entertainment Branding, Marketing and Promoting, the African-American in the field and has taught and lectured Entertainment Law for 50 years. Many of the agents and lawyers in the business where instructed, consulted, influenced or inspired by his work….

Abdul Jalil, without ever attending Law School, has made “Law Review” with UNPRECEDENTED cases establishing NEW LAW in FOUR different areas, and published in over SEVEN Universities Law Reviews, Scholarly Commons, and multiple Course Outlines, Student Journals in the specialty area of Contracts, Finance, Interest, Loans, Reserve/Free Agency System and Restraint of Trade, Sherman Anti-trust Act (15 USC § 1,2), NLRA, Labor Exemption from Antitrust Law, Collective Bargaining, Labor law, Antitrust, Federal Arbitration, Civil Rights, and Insurance- Appraisal, Bad Faith, Fraud; Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show Founder, Producer and Host, CSA; Expert and Guest Political/Legal/Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Analyst and Commentator; Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Law Lecturer/Presenter; Sports Color Commentator; His “The Stars” show was the FIRST Cable Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show in 1973; OpEd Columnist/Journalist; Sports, Music, Entertainment and Variety Film, TV, Concert and Special Events Content Creator/Producer/Developer/Runner/Promoter; Islamic Dawah Lecturer/Presenter; His Computer Intelligence Company First and Only Minority Certified IBM, Apple, Compact, Microsoft Computer Value Added Dealer (1982); Computer Technology Lecturer/Presenter; MWBE Specialist.

Historic “al-Hakim” use of Interest-Free Loans upon the Tax Codes published in Universities Law Reviews, Scholarly Commons, and multiple Course Outlines, Student Journals
Abdul Jalil negotiated a series of contracts that included many unprecedented benefits to the individual clients, one of which was interest-free loans that could be forgiven. Upon review by the Internal Revenue Service, the contracts and  returns where thrown out and challenged by the IRS as the IRS filed suit. After an 8 year legal battle, he prevailed in Federal Tax Court and established that Interest free Loans where in fact legal. This unprecedented legal ruling was established as a standard in the Tax Laws and was written in several National Law Journals. Cite:  “IRS vs Al-Hakim” published by Commerce Clearing House (CCH) Tax Court Memorandum Cases editions KF 6234A 505 and Maxwell McMillian (Prentice Hall) Federal Tax Cases edition KF 6234A 512 Tax Court Memorandum Decisions. Articles and citations available upon request.

The Lyman Bostock Story Part 1

Lyman Bostock signs RICHEST contract in Professional Sports and Baseball History

1978- Outfielder Lyman Bostock, on his 27th birthday, signed a five-year contract with the California Angels Monday for a $3.5 million plus-the most lucrative deal ever for a team sport athlete.

The unprecedented deal included a FULLY GUARANTEED, five year, $600,000 annual salary, $500,000 signing bonus, a $500,000 Interest free loan, and a $200,000 Interest free business contract loan! The FULLY GUARANTEED contract was PAID in full, after he was murdered on the last day of his first year of the contract with four years left to perform!

The Lyman Bostock Story Part 2

The National Basketball Association (Denver Nuggets) vs. The National Basketball Players Association (Brian Taylor)”, Jan. 25, 1978.

In a Historical, Unprecedented case in Sports and Professional Basketball, Abdul-Jalil and Superstar Management, along with NBA player Brian Taylor, negotiated an addendum to the standard NBA contract with the Denver Nuggets for a $250.000 interest free loan and making the contract “tax free”.

Taylor had a clause that stipulated be could become a free agent if the Nuggets breeched his contract in any manner.

The Nuggets made the first payment of $50,000 due him on time. He said they were 19 days late on the second payment before making a partial payment. The third payment, which was due Jan. 1, was over 13 days late, according to Taylor. They did.

So, in mid-season the team had sufficiently breached the contract, according to Jalil, defaulting by 13 days on the final part of a $250,000 interest free loan with the late payments that triggered the clause in the addendum that allowed Taylor to opt out of the contract. Taylor withheld his services from that point in the middle of the season.

Taylor’s agent, Abdul Jalil, said in NewYork that Taylor becomes a free agent immediately should the Nuggets deviate from any portion of the agreement. Jalil said the agreement is unique in that it contains a clause providing that should Taylor sign with another NBA team, Denver, may not receive compensation in the form of players, or draft choices. The compensation must be in the form of cash, half of which goes to Taylor and half to the Nuggets.

This clause reportedly was unprecedented in major league sports player contracts and expects NBA Commissioner Larry O’Brien to call a Collective Bargaining Federal Arbitration hearing on the case because the contract clause is so unique.

Jalil is the agent who represented baseball infielder Junior Moore, who won free agency from the Atlanta Braves in a landmark contract agreement following the 1977 season in a Federal Arbitration case of Moore (MLBPA) vs. Atlanta Braves (MLB). Moore’s contract permitted him to declare himself a free agent based on his own value judgment of the amount of playing time he had with the Braves. Used as only a part-time performer, Moore chose to leave Atlanta and signed with the Chicago White Sox.

The unprecedented case in Professional Sports and Basketball was necessary as the the addendum to the contract was the result of Taylor’s dispute of the contract that was originally negotiated by the players union director Larry Fleisher. The inherent problems that this situation provided for the National Basketball Association, the Denver Nuggets, and most importantly the Director of the NBA Players Union and the Union itself, were incredible, FILLED WITH CONFLICTS OF INTEREST, MULTIPLE INSTANCES OF FRAUD, COLLUSION, and MISREPRESENTATION! The case was so bad that Larry Fleisher, the Director of the NBA Players Union and the Union itself, could NOT represent Taylor in the Federal Arbitration hearing.

In mid-season the team breached the contract with a late payment that triggered a clause in the addendum that allowed him to opt out of the contract. The player withheld his services in the middle of the season and the Nuggets and the NBA filed for Federal Arbitration. In prevailing in this matter, Taylor received his FULL PAY, an interest free loan, was declared free of his contract (“a Free Agent”), and allowed to negotiate a new contract with the team of his choice. Cite Arbitration Decision in the matter of “The National Basketball Association (Denver Nuggets) vs. The National Basketball Players Association (Brian Taylor)”, Jan. 25, 1978.

The Nuggets declined to have tapes of the Taylor negotiating sessions heard by renowned federal arbitrator Peter Seitz, who agreed Taylor was free, but that the Nuggets were due compensation.

Major Leagues of Professional Baseball Clubs (Atlanta Braves) vs. The Major League Baseball Players Association (Alvin Jr. Moore)

1977- One of the earliest Professional Sports contract controversies involved Major League Baseball Player Free Agency that arose as the result of an unprecedented, landmark contract between Alvin “Junior” Moore and the Atlanta Braves in which a Special Covenant gave Moore the right to demand a trade which could not be consummated without his prior consent if he was dissatisfied with his playing time. In the event that a trade could not be consummated by the end of the 1977 championship season, Moore would become a free agent if he so desired. See “The Major Leagues of Professional Baseball Clubs (Atlanta Braves) vs. The Major League Baseball Players Association (Alvin Jr. Moore). http://www.box.net/shared/4apqfv9fpg 

Jerry Gandy- Richmond Independent: Press Row on Jr. Moore

Alvin “Junior” Moore was only a rookie, yet here are the terms of the contract his agent Abdul-Jalil put together for him:

-The Braves were to pay Moore $75,000 that season. That was only his salary.

-They also were to pay him a $50,000 bonus and provide him with an additional $50,000 interest-free loan.

That’s was historic for a rookie, but wait, there’s more coming.

The imaginative, foresighted agent Abdul-Jalil saw to it that four other unique clauses were written into the Atlanta Braves contract of Moore.

“If Moore is dissatisfied with his playing time, he can submit a letter to the Braves notifying them of same, who then must initiate a trade to the team of Moore’s choice, which can only be consummated with his consent. If there is no trade by the end of the season, the contract is voided and he becomes a free agent.”

1) The first unique clause gave Moore the option of demanding a trade to another team of his choice upon his notice to the team of his dissatisfaction with his playing time; becoming a free agent simply by notifying the Braves of his intention, which works out to be the same as anytime he choses. Under the present Basic Agreement between the players and the owners, a player becomes a free agent ONLY after six-year service requirement with a team has been fulfilled AND only after the second year he plays for a team without signing a contract the previous year.

2) The second unique clause allowed Moore to veto any trade the Braves might involve him in if he did not approve of the team in the proposed trade;

3) The third unique clause gave him the option of choosing the team he wished to be traded to;

4) The forth unique clause gave Moore the option of becoming a free agent if a trade to a team of his choice in not consummated. Under the then present Basic Agreement between the players and the owners, a player becomes a free agent the second year only after he plays for a team without signing a contract the previous year.

Alvin Jr. Moore Atlanta Braves Rookie Card

What club owner in the world would ever sign a rookie to a contract like that?

The contract was signed by Ted Turner, the Braves’ owner, March 14, 1977.

When National League President Chub Feeney first saw Moore’s contract and its special freedom clause, he rejected it disapproving this Special Covenant and on April 28, Feeney, wrote a letter to Bill Lucas, the Braves’ Director of Player Personnel.

The letter said:

“Specific covenants contained in Alvin Moore’s contract are disapproved because it (the contract) contains provisions inconsistent with the reserve system article of the new Basic Agreement.

Please be sure the player receives a copy of this letter.”

The Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) filed a Federal grievance on the ground that actual or potential additional benefits were provided for the player within the meaning of the collective agreement. The clubs maintained that the free agency provisions in the 1976 agreement were exclusive, providing the only basis upon which free agency rights could be exercised.

But the union argued that there were still other avenues to free agency, such as an unconditional release by a club because the player was not sufficiently qualified. The arbitrator held, in this case, that “the six-year service requirement through which a player could exercise free agency was for the individual club’s benefit in the sense that it would want to retain the player for a particular period of time.” Thus, the benefit of “long-term title and reservation rights” could be waived by the club. On the other hand, the reentry mechanism through which other clubs would have an opportunity to negotiate with a player who becomes a free agent was a matter covered by all the collective bargaining agreement, so an attempt by club and player to evade such procedures would be “inconsistent” and thus prohibited. Said the Arbitrator:

There is clear merit in the Association’s argument that the words “additional benefits to the Player” should be liberally construed to support a wide variety of benefits to a Player over and above the benefits accorded to him by the Basic Agreement. Though covenants containing such benefits may be “inconsistent” with a particular provision of the Agreement dealing with the same subject matter, there is logic in the Association’s argument that they are not, in fact, “inconsistent” because Article II authorizes such inconsistencies where they provide additional benefits to the Player.”?

Marvin Miller, the MLBPA Executive Director said “Junior Moore’s contract has done more for baseball as anything in the basic agreement just signed by the Players Association and the owners”.

Moore went on to sign a very lucrative, multi year contract with the Chicago White Sox.

LECTURER AND PRESENTER IN THE FIELDS OF:

*ENTERTAINMENT LAW*
*THE ART OF REPRESENTING PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES AND ENTERTAINERS*
*REPRESENTING THE PRODUCER*
*REPRESENTING THE DIRECTOR*
*REPRESENTING THE SUPERSTAR*
*GETTING MONEY FOR YOUR MOVIE*
*LICENSING MOTION PICTURES*

*DIGITAL MOVIEMAKING*
*THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS*
*THE BUSINESS OF ENTERTAINMENT*
*SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING*
*ADVERTISING, MARKETING, PROMOTION, SPONSORSHIPS, BRANDING AND HIP HOP CULTURE*
*HIP HOP AND THE SPREAD OF ISLAM*
*ISLAM AND MUSIC*

LECTURED AND PRESENTED AT:

1995 Sports Image Awards Program Cover

~Leon Powe’s “Powe Folks” Basketball Camp, Oakland, CA. 2006-8,

~ Lynn Harris’ “Fourth Quarter Athletics Basketball Showcase” (with Ashley and Courtney Paris(OU), Devanei Hampton (Cal), Alexis Gray-Lawson (Cal), Candice Wiggins (Stanford), Brooke Smith (Stanford), and Ashley Walker(Cal), Oakland, CA. 2006,

~Golden State Warriors Adonal Foyle’s “Athletics and Academics” Basketball Camp, Oakland, CA. 2006,

~Music in Islam, University of California, Berkeley, CA 2003~ National Islamic Convention, Seacaucus, NJ 1997,

~ Host Evening of Elegance, National Arabic Conference, Oakland, CA. 1997,

~ National Islamic Convention, N.Y.C, N.Y. 1996,

~ International Islamic Conference, Los Angeles, CA. 1996,

~ Oaktown Music Conference, Oakland, CA 1996,

~ National Society of Black Engineers Conference-Region 6, San Luis Obispo, CA.  1992,

~ CAREER FEST, Oakland, CA. 1986, ~ California State University, Hayward, CA.  1985,

~ United States Coast Guard, Oakland, CA.  1982,

~ National BALSA Law Conference, Houston, TX 1981,

~ National BALSA Law Conference, Philadelphia, PA. 1982,

~ National BALSA Law Conference, Oakland, CA. 1979,

March 1979- The Historic BALSA 1979 National Law Convention
The historic Black American Law Students Association, 11th Annual National Convention, March 28-April 1, 1979, Hyatt, Oakland, was themed: “The Reconstruction of Black Civilizations.” Dedicated to- Rev. Ben Chavis of the Wilmington Ten, Introduction- Mayor Lionel Wilson, Keynote Speaker- Min. Louis Farrakhan, with veritable “Who’s Who” of nations leading Black presenters: Junius Williams-Pres. NBA, Hon. Ben Travis, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, Don Warden (Khalid al-Mansour), Dave Wilmont-Georgetown Law Center; Howard Moore, Alfred Slocum- Rutgers School of Law, Angela Davis, Victor Goode- Ex. Dir. NCBL, Hon. Judith Ford, Herb Reed- Howard School of Law, Asa Hilliard, Nathan Hare, Ron Baily- Northwestern University, Michael Ashburne, David Hall- FTC, Denice Carty Bernia- North Eastern University; Moot Court Judges: Hon. Wiley Manuel, Hon. Clinton White, Hon. David Cunningham, Hon. Allen Broussard, with “Thanks” to -John Burris, Peter Cohen, Claude Ames, Robert Harris, Eva Patterson, George Holland.

~ National BALSA Law Conference, N.Y.C., N.Y. 1980,

~ Mountain Regional Law Convention, Oklahoma City, OK. 1980,

~ College of Alameda, Alameda, CA.  1981,

~ Eastern Regional Law Conference, Washington D.C. 1980,

~ National Black Media Convention, Oakland, CA. 1972,

~ National BALSA Law Conference, Washington D.C. 1976,

~ Pacific Coast Law Conference, San Francisco, CA. 1976,

~ Stanford Law Society, Palo Alto, CA. 1976,

~ National Black History Week Awards, San Francisco, CA, 1974

Historic “al-Hakim” use of Interest-Free Loans upon the Tax Codes published in Universities Law Reviews, Scholarly Commons, and multiple Course Outlines, Student Journals
Abdul Jalil negotiated a series of contracts that included many unprecedented benefits to the individual clients, one of which was interest-free loans that could be forgiven. Upon review by the Internal Revenue Service, the contracts and  returns where thrown out and challenged by the IRS as the IRS filed suit. After an 8 year legal battle, he prevailed in Federal Tax Court and established that Interest free Loans where in fact legal. This unprecedented legal ruling was established as a standard in the Tax Laws and was written in several National Law Journals. Cite:  “IRS vs Al-Hakim” published by Commerce Clearing House (CCH) Tax Court Memorandum Cases editions KF 6234A 505 and Maxwell McMillian (Prentice Hall) Federal Tax Cases edition KF 6234A 512 Tax Court Memorandum Decisions. Articles and citations available upon request….

The Historic “al-Hakim” Tax Code §7872 [692] Ruling
After al-Hakim’s victory in the Federal Tax Courts against the Tax Commissioner, in

Abdul-Jalil

December 2000 the IRS moved to change the Tax Codes with the historic “al-Hakim” Tax Code §7872 [692] Ruling. The IRS changed the Federal Tax Codes such that it now “prevents no-interest loans” and was instituted to eliminate and close the Federal Income Tax loop-hole created with al-Hakim’s use of interest free loans in sports and entertainment financial transactions.
CITE: Tax Notes, Dec. 4, 2000, p. 1311; 89 Tax Notes 1311 (Dec. 4, 2000) “al-Hakim Tax Code” Ruling
al-Hakim’s victory in the Federal Tax Court over the U. S. Tax Commissioner has the nations foremost academic institutions and academians in the study of Law and Business teaching al-Hakim’s use of interest free loans in Tax Free financial transactions as part of the Law and Business curriculum in such hallowed halls as Harvard University, Yale University,Washington University, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and Wake Forest University Schools of Law Federal Tax Courses, among others.

Washington University School of Law Federal Tax Course,
Professor: Bixby;
Yale University School of Law Federal Tax Course,

Professor: Eric M. Zolt
Text Authors: William A. Klein, Joseph Bankman, Daniel N. Shaviro;

University of Virginia School of Law Federal Tax Course,
Professor: M. Robinson * Federal Income Taxation * L. Dominick
Text Authors: William A. Klein, Joseph Bankman, Daniel N. Shaviro;
Washington & Lee University School of Law Federal Tax Course,

Harvard University School of Law Federal Income Taxation Course Outline,
Professor: Flusche
al-Hakim’s victory in the Federal Tax Court over the U. S. Tax Commissioner has academians teaching al-Hakim’s use of interest free loans in Tax Free financial transactions as part of a Wake Forest University School of Law Federal Tax Course on “ISLAMIC AND JEWISH PERSPECTIVES ON INTEREST” and al-Hakim’s historic impact on Shariah-Riba Complaint financial transactions in the business world.
Wake Forest University School of Law Tax Course on “ISLAMIC & JEWISH PERSPECTIVES ON INTEREST”,

Jalil with Robert Shapiro and Bill Walsh

Author/Professor: Newman, Joel S.
al-Hakim’s victory in the Federal Tax Court over the U. S. Tax Commissioner has academians teaching al-Hakim’s use of interest free loans in Tax Free financial transactions as part of the Wake Forest University School of Law Federal Tax Course on “ISLAMIC AND JEWISH PERSPECTIVES ON INTEREST” and al-Hakim’s historic impact on Shariah-Riba Complaint financial transactions in the business world.
Joel S. Newman is a professor at Wake Forest Law School, Winston Salem, North Carolina.
In this report, Newman discusses financial transactions that allow devout Muslims and Jews to obey religious prohibitions against interest, while giving investors a return on their investments. The tax treatment of these transactions is considered. An integral part is al-Hakim’s case.

CASES PUBLISHED IN UNIVERSITIES LAW REVIEWS, ENTERTAINMENT AND SPORTS COURSE OUTLINES AND PUBLICATIONS on ALVIN MOORE LANDMARK LEGAL CASE

Case Western Law Review

Case Western Reserve Law Review Volume 31 Summer 1981 Number 4

A Long Deep Drive to Collective Bargaining: Of Players, Owners, Brawls, and Strikes.

Professor Robert C. Berry, Professor William B. Gould

Student Journals at Case Western Reserve University School of Law Scholarly Commons

UMass School Law

University of Massachusetts- Amherst

Major League Baseball’s Grievance Arbitration System

by Glenn M. Wong, Professor of Sports Law

Entertainment and Sports Law

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Marquette University School of Law Sports Law Institute

Marquette University School of Law

Entertainment and Sports Law Commons Journals at Marquette Law Scholarly Commons

Interpreting the NFL Player Contract

Professor Gary R. Roberts

Marquette Sports Law Review- Volume 3, Issue 1, Article 5, Fall

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Vanderbilt University School of Law

Vanderbilt University School of Law

Sports Law – Knight Commission: purpose was to examine NCAA athletics and make recommendations

Professor Joseph Fishman

Studocu

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UNLV Boyd School of Law- Sports Lawyers

University of Nevada-Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law

Course: Sports Law: Competition Law | National Collegiate Athletic Association

Professor Marc Kligman, Adjunct. Sports Law

University of Nevada William S. Boyd School of Law

UNLV 87169927

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Santa Clara University School of Law

Santa Clara University School of Law

Legal Professions: Sports Law

The Role of the Commissioner and Other Governing Authorities

Professor Alan W. Scheflin – Santa Clara Law

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Quimbee Law School Case Briefs, Overview, Casebooks, study aids, BAR Review, and online Continuing Legal Education (CLE) courses

Quimbee Law School Case Briefs, Overview, Casebooks, study aids, BAR Review, and online Continuing Legal Education (CLE) courses

Alvin Moore vs Atlanta Braves

Major League Baseball Arbitration Proceeding

MLB-MLBPA Arb. 77-18 (1977)

Professor A. Porter

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Course Hero Law School Case Briefs

Course Hero Sports Law Outline

1968 Basic Agreement made the Commissioner the arbitrator clearly allowing for arbitration of reserve system grievances.
University of Texas School of Law

Course Title: LAW 111

6) Agent Representation – The collective agreement plays the ultimate governing role

Quizlet Law School Case Briefs

Quizlet, Sports Law 1-3

Alvin Moore & Atlanta Braves (1977)

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Judd’s Sports Law Outline

SPORTS LAW OUTLINE

Chapter 1 – Best Interests of the Sport: The Role of the Commissioner and Other Governing Authorities

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Jerry Gandy- Richmond Independent: Press Row on Jr. Moore

NetSuite Inc:

Alvin Moore & Atlanta Braves …

D. Arbitration as an Exclusive Remedy; § 301 Preemption

ABDUL-JALIL RECEIVES “Certificate of Recognition” from the CALIFORNIA SATE ASSEMBLY for 2021 HUMANITARIAN, CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS ACHIEVEMENTS

ABDUL-JALIL RECEIVES “Certificate of Recognition” from the CALIFORNIA SATE ASSEMBLY for 2021 HUMANITARIAN, CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS ACHIEVEMENTS

As CEO and President of the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation (AMWF), I want to sincerely “THANK” ALL my/our supporters and I am thankful of the recognition for the work done as a Humanitarian for societal change/advancement with the establishment of real economic, social, and political equality across gender and color lines, in Civil Rights and Social Services addressing: Homelessness; Constitutional Reform; Social Justice Reform; Hunger and Food Insecurity; Police Reform; Climate Justice Reform; Criminal Justice Reform; Gun Violence; Religious Hate, Bias, Islamophobia, Xenophobia and Bigotry; Immigration/Refugee Crisis; Healthcare; Education Equality; School-to-Prison Pipeline; Wealth Inequality/Poverty and Basic Needs; Voter Rights; COVID-19 Pandemic Relief Response; Sport and Athletes Human Rights and the fight for Judicial Reform to END Grand Systemic and Endemic Corruption, that includes Judicial/Legal Systemic Racism, Bigotry, Persecution, as a subset, that provides for the unlawful, and unconstitutional acts of The “COURTEL”- COURT CORRUPTION CARTEL, the Corruptocrats and Kleptocrat politicians.

Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) “Portraitist of the Famous”

“Perhaps I should say, flatly, what I believe–that he is a great painter, among the very greatest; but I do know that great art can only be created out of love, and that no greater lover has ever held a brush.”

James Baldwin (1924-1987), writer,
friend of artist Beauford Delaney

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971oil on canvas

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971

In 1971 Abdul-Jalil had the HONOR of having his portrait painted by Beauford Delaney, hailed as the most important African-American artists of the 20th century, whose life appeared to symbolize the mythical artistic existence of privation and relative obscurity, that show a retrospective of “uninhibited colorist (though never an unintelligent one)” that is “apotheosized” and whose talent and “free, open and outgoing nature” engendered admiration from everyone whom was fortunate enough to encounter him as he was THE darling of the international culture scene in New York and Paris. James Baldwin called him his “spiritual father.”

Remembering THE Greatest artists of the 20th century, the ‘amazing and invariable’ Beauford Delaney, the “Portraitist of the Famous”, who’s masterpieces are trumpeted as cutting-edge work in Black aesthetics, stylistic evolution from representation to pure abstraction, with new and radical theories with his techniques and expression of the politics of Black arts, affording him his very own, singular serious stature among abstract expressionists, transforming the critical landscape into a growing interest in his creation of “Black Abstraction”!

For more than a decade, Delaney showed compelling, vibrant images of energetic life: produced engaging abstract works, portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light, powerful works of art and culture, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day.

The fascinating Beauford Delaney is a Modern artist who produced engaging portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of New York life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light following his move to Paris in 1953, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day! 

The career of Beauford Delaney (1901-79) was mainly working with Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance who’s first exhibition was New Names In American Art: Recent Contributions To Painting And Sculpture By Negro Artists at The Renaissance Society in Chicago, IL in 1944, and the most recent exhibition was Art Basel Miami Beach 2020 – online viewing only at Art Basel Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL in 2020. Beauford Delaney is mostly exhibited in United States, but also had exhibitions in Germany, United Kingdom and elsewhere. Delaney has 10 solo shows and 79 group shows over the last 76 years (for more information, see biography). Delaney has also been in 7 art fairs but in no biennials. The most important show was Beauford Delaney: From New York to Paris at Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia, PA in 2005. Other important shows were at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, MN and The Studio Museum in Harlem in New York City, NY. Beauford Delaney has been exhibited with Norman Lewis and Romare Bearden. Beauford Delaney’s art is in 9 museum collections, at France at the Museum of Modern Art , École des Beaux-Arts, Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, NY and The Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, IL, featured in Jet and Playboy magazines among others.

Beauford Delaney is ranked among the Top 10 globally, and in United States. Delaney’s best rank was in 1944, theartist’s rank has improved over the last 5 years, with the most dramatic change in 1992.

His list of friends and acquaintances including artists, World Leaders, politicians, activist, authors/poets/writers, intellectuals, filmmakers, promoted by numerous patrons of the arts, world Cultural Ambassadors, art gallery owners, befriended by notable figures, and musicians Stuart Davis — his closest painter compatriot — W.E.B. Du Bois (whose portrait he painted), Salvadore Dalí (whose portrait he painted), Countee Cullen, Louis Armstrong (whose portrait he painted), Duke Ellington (whose portrait he painted), Ethel Waters (whose portraits he painted), W.C. Handy (whose portrait he painted), Henry Miller (who wrote a tribute to him), John F. Kennedy (whose portraits he painted), Robert Kennedy (whose portraits he painted), Jean-Claude Killy (whose portraits he painted), Herb Gentry, Alain Locke, Cy Twombly, Sterling Brown,  Langston Hughes, Georgia O’Keeffe (who drew charcoal and pastel portraits of Delaney in 1943), Augusta Savage, Stuart Davis, John Marin, Pablo Picasso (whose portrait he painted), Richard A. Long (whose portrait he painted), John Koenig (whose portrait he painted), and Claude McKay were connected to Paris in various ways. 

Luminaries Josephine Baker, Bob Blackburn, Ed Clark, Bob Thompson, Marian Anderson (whose portrait he painted), Jacob Lawrence, Ella Fitzgerald (whose portrait he painted), Zora Neale Hurston, Alfred Stieglitz, Carl Van Vechten, Edward Steichen, Dorothy Norman, Anaïs Nin, art studio owner Charles Alston, Jackson Pollock, Vassili Pikoula, Henri Chahine (whose portrait he painted), Charlie Parker (whose portrait and music he painted.), James Jones, Jean Genet, Lawrence Calcagno, Cab Calloway, Elaine DeKooning, Palmer C. Hayden (whose portrait he painted), art dealer Darthea Speyer (whose portrait he painted) who had exhibitions of Delaney’s art at Paris’ Galerie Lambert in 1964. Others include artists Charles Boggs, Al Hirschfeld, John Franklin Koenig, Harold Cousins, Herbert Gentry (whose portrait he painted), Ed Clark, and Ellis Wilson, authors James Jones and Henry Miller (who was also a water colorist), Writers Richard Wright, Surrealist poet Stanislas Rodanski, Chester Himes, Ralph Ellison, William Gardner Smith, Richard Gibson, Lorraine Hansberry, Ted Joans, art historian Richard A. Long, and his friend Lynn Stone.

Nominated for Emmy, GLAAD Awards
“Out. The Glenn Burke Story”
 
COMCAST SPORTSNET’S PRESENTATION
ABOUT FIRST OPENLY GAY
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYER

Click link for “Out. The Glenn Burke Story” YouTube Promotion:

 

“Out. The Glenn Burke Story” documents the extent of Burke’s courage, strife and friendship throughout his life, and the compassion and callousness of the sport of baseball.  The program weaves together insights from Burke’s teammates and friends, including Dusty Baker, Davey Lopes, Sports Agent Abdul-Jalil, Reggie Smith, Rick Monday, Manny Mota, Rickey Henderson, Claudell Washington, Mike Norris, Shooty Babitt, Tito Fuentes, and former Major Leaguer and gay rights activist Billy Bean. Out. The Glenn Burke Story Narrated by Dave Morey, Bay Area Broadcasting Icon and Member of the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame’s Class of 2010

We have attached the links to a short video documentary about a radio conversation, the live radio broadcasts on November 20, 2010 over ABC Networks’ KGO 810 FM Radio Show and on December 4, 2010 over KNBR- The Sports Leader, 680 AM and ESPN Radio “The Ticket” 1050 AM, of the discussion of the film “OUT. The Glenn Burke Story” The ABC- KGO Radio broadcast was with Shooty Babbitt, John Lambert and Abdul-Jalil. The KNBR show was with Doug Harris, the producer of “Out. The Glenn Burke Story” on the show “Law and Sports” with host attorney Ivan Golde, whose also a legal analyst for CNN, Warner Bros- KRON, and CBS-KPIX, among others.
The on-air discussions were about Glenn, the film, society and sports. We think you will be very moved with the overall content and how Glenn’s impact has becoming a serious topic of discussion around the country. Glenn lives on!!!

Short documentary about a radio conversation with Sports and Entertainment Manager-Agent Abdul-Jalil, Oakland A’s Executive Shooty Babitt and NBC Sports Broadcaster John Lambert, some of the cast members of OUT. The Glenn Burke Story. The topic of the discussion was gays in professional sports. The conversation was hosted by Rich Walcolf, and filmed at KGO 810 studios in San Francisco.

KGO Radio’s broadcast discussion of “Out. The Glenn Burke Story”
http://superstarmanagement.podomatic.com/entry/2010-11-21T18_19_40-08_00The Sports Leader, KNBR 680 AM and ESPN Radio “The Ticket” 1050 AM.http://superstarmanagement.podomatic.com/entry/2010-12-04T21_21_33-08_00

EDUCATION:
1972-73 Stanford University Graduate School of Business, Stanford, California; Candidate for Degree of Masters in Business Administration.
1968-71 University of California School of Business, Berkeley, California, Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and Policy. Minor in Educational Psychology and Sociology.

HONORS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
~ Graduated from High School with honors,~ Deans List at U.C. Berkeley,~ Ford Foundation Scholar and COGME Fellowship Award at Stanford University Graduate School of Business,~ Federal Law Review, 1987,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO “, United States Registry, 1990,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO IN CALIFORNIA “, California Historical Society, 1982,~ Enshrined in ” OUTSTANDING YOUNG MEN OF AMERICA “ United States Jaycees, 1982,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO IN ELECTRONICS”, United States Registry, 1989,~ Acknowledgement from ” CITY Of OAKLAND “, Oakland, CA.  1982,~ Acknowledgement from ” UNITED STATES CONGRESS, 7TH DISTRICT “, Oakland, CA.  1974,

Abdul-Jalil was honored in Miami, Florida and Haiti

World Conference of Mayors

2010- Abdul-Jalil was honored in Miami, Florida and Haiti, for the Relief Missions to Arch Bishop Joel Jeune of Grace Village in Haiti

they received from the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation, Stepping Together and Superstar Management with recognition of The World Conference of Mayors (WCM) and The National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM). This is a tangible reality of SUCCESS in Haiti for ALL the members of the organizations world-wide rather than the many idle cocktail party rants and raves of projects that exist without any substance behind them!

They are now moving forward in a meaningful way to secure financial, subsistence, construction and medical aid and support for the next mission which will take place as soon as we can unite to raise the necessary items just mentioned. They can tap into the resources of the USAIDS and the National Medical Association to make great progress in securing bi-weekly missions to various needed areas around the World!
They are committed and prepared to work with the WCM and NCBM organizations to raise funds, provide support and organize continued relief efforts for financial donations, to deliver much needed medical support and supplies; food; clothing; educational materials; construction support and building materials; much needed personal items; and legal assistance for displaced children from orphanages that were given transportation and temporary housing in the United States with other families, churches, and organizations until homes have been rebuilt to house them. Where most relief efforts are limited, if not stopped altogether by current travel restrictions in, within, and out of Haiti, The World Conference of Mayors has some political cache that it can exercise to further achieve our united goals globally. This could be the first step toward fulfilling several of their conversations of their organizations providing relief support to WCM and NCBM efforts globally.
Additionally, in relations to their working together on relief missions here in America and globally, Abdul-Jalil is exploring the possibility of a telethon, perhaps with J. C. Watts Black Television News Channel (BTNC). To that end the WCM is prepared to provide it’s full support to his and their joint efforts to overcome the continual need for financial assistance to achieve their goals. These fundraising efforts include the proposed telethon as a measure to not only raise funds but to raise awareness for the causes as well. Now they are moving forward with these joint and several fundraising efforts with a goal of working together on projects of mutual interest and support in a spirit of oneness.
Again, there is much work to do and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together are committed and prepared to work with WCM and NCBM organizations to raise funds and organize continued relief efforts to provide assistance to countries around the world, especially Africa, the Caribbean and South/Central America.
Page One of Letter

Page Two of Letter

2003- al-Hakim Prevails in Motion to Vacate the Appraisal Awards Against CSAA
In February 2003 after 3 years of defendants legal delays with ten motions for terminating sanctions to prevent the motion from being heard, al-Hakim prevailed in his Motion to Vacate the Appraisal awards against CSAA. (View or download Order here http://www.box.net/shared/n10p7erncv)
The courts found that the awards had to be vacated if, among other grounds, “the award was procured by corruption, fraud, or other undue means”; or the appraisers(A. Michael  DeCeasare, Ruben Estrada, Ron Magin and Gene Roberts) “exceeded their powers and the award cannot be corrected without affecting the merits of the decision upon the controversy submitted”. The order further cited the improper use of “cash value” as replacement cost, use of erroneous “used cost” figures, denial of coverage, injection of fraud, concealment, breach of contract, and coverage issues without any reason or evidence, CSAA could not defend their actions nor those of their own appraiser. What the court did not address in the motion to vacate was the actual collusion and fraud again perpetrated upon the court by the defendant Ron Cook and the hostile intervener when they provided to and the appraisal panel adopted the improper “cash values” used in the vacated award and the exhibits to support them came directly from the presentation of CSAA’s expert Gary Halpin at the vacated appraisal, and that the fraudulent award itself was further prepared, written, submitted and distributed by defendant Cook and the hostile intervener. This victory locks CSAA in on the Bad Faith actions we submitted to the courts and are subject to summary judgment.

2005- Federal Complaint with United States Attorney General, Department of Justice, of Hate Crime of Islamophobia and Xenophobia
In 2005 he filed a federal complaint with the United States Attorney General, Department of Justice, of a hate crime of Islamophobia and Xenophobia committed against him by Judge David C. Lee during a trial in Superior Court of Alameda County, California, that is moving forward with the investigation and charges of criminal extrinsic fraud upon the court of the State of California, spoliation of evidence, and the doctrine “unclean hands” against defendants/hostile intervener AAA Insurance; Ron Cook and the law firm of WILLOUGHBY, STUART & BENING; defense counsel Steve Barber and the law firm of Ropers Majeski; and others. The complaint, drafted and filed by al-Hakim in pro per, has broad based support from Democrats and Republicans, was submitted by Congresswoman Barbara Lee with the offices of Congressmen John Conyers, and Charles Rangel, has been review by several legal experts, with advocacy by former Republican Senator J. C. Watts, a client of al-Hakim’s.
The complaint addresses the concern that a Superior Court Judges’ conduct rose to the level of consideration for a Federal Crime and a Civil Rights violation because the bench upon which the judge rules is “under the color of law” and certainly the violation of anyone’s civil rights is a federal crime. “Muslims, just as any other group, can not be afraid to speak up when their rights have been abridged. If one does not speak up, then the transgressions goes unreported and the perpetrator goes on to harm again unchecked, it does not matter whom the transgressor is” said al-Hakim. The complaint, perhaps even more importantly, not only requested Merrily Friedlander, Chief of the Civil Rights Division, to make an investigation of a judicial hate crime, but also the many other civil rights and due process violations of judicial misconduct, and attorney extrinsic fraud upon the court and law that are themselves directly the matters complained. J. C. Watts in asking “What does a supposed terrorist act in Russia have to do with the negligent contamination of a home in America?” posed the argument that there must be consideration of and a response to the many issues in the complaint.
2005 – Present,  “Powe Folks” NBA World Champion Basketball Camp at Leon Powe of the NBA World Champion Boston Celtics
Promoted, Marketed and provided Media for Leon Powe’s “Powe Folks” NBA World Champion Basketball Camp.
In Game 2 of the NBA Finals, Powe, a second-year, second-round draft pick from Oakland was the Celtics hero. Years earlier, he was his family’s hero, as he helped keep his siblings together while they bounced between 26 different homeless shelters in a year during a patch when his mother couldn’t afford shelter. It’s one of the most touching sports stories in ages, and his emergence as a playoff force only highlights it.
ABC/ESPN produced a short biography on how Leon overcame tremendous adversity to make it on the Boston Celtics. The night this aired, Powe wowed the international television crowd as he scored 21 points off the bench in less than 15 minutes to spark the Boston Celtics to a 108-102 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers to take a 2-0 lead in the NBA Finals.The Celtics went on to win the NBA Championship.

Hammer in Russia for President Yeltsin’s 1996 Re-Election Campaign

November 1995-  M C Hammer in Russia, The Re-election of Russian President Boris Yeltsin by “Our Home Is Russia”, Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin’s Political Party
Prime Minister Chernomyrdin’s party was struggling to distance their leader from the unpopularity of the Government he headed, resolved to using western style campaign strategy. “Our Home” promised economic stability and continuation of the Democratic course of Yeltsin’s government.
November 1995 al-Hakim executive produced, produced, filmed and broadcast on Russian National TV a series of concerts in St. Petersburg and concerts in Moscow by MC Hammer in an urban style, “Rap-The-Vote” to secure the 18-45 voter turnout and re-election of President Boris Yeltsin. Polling after the concerts was overwhelmingly positive..
“Hammer is our father and rap is a very serious subject for me and if Chernomyrdin can give us Hammer then we will give him our vote.” said Oleg, an 18-year old Russian rap fan in attendance.
Being Prime Minister gave Chernomyrdin a huge advantage in access to Russian voters, with slick campaign posters, he told AP “we are using American pop music performances to drum up support among Russian youth for his political campaign”; the video scenes showed M.C. Hammer performing. Chernomyrdin’s travels around Russia in his capacity as Prime Minister, but looked more like the political campaign trail of an American President.
This strategy was trumpeted as “world altering” for saving Russian democracy with Yeltsin’s re-election ensuring continuity in the evolution of Russia and securing world peace.
This strategy was heralded world wide by political pundits as “incredibly brilliant”, a “triumph for democratic reform” and “world altering” in it’s effect of having “saved” Russian democracy, as Yeltsin was the only alternative in ensuring continuity in the evolution of Russia and securing world peace.
This coup, a miraculous event in history, was depicted and canonized in a 2004 film “Spinning Boris” starring Jeff Goldblum, Anthony LaPaglia and Liev Schreiber.

“Spinning Boris” The Best President of Russia America Ever Had   ..L. A. Times Review
Jeff Goldblum, Anthony LaPaglia and Liev Schreiber star as a trio of elite American political campaign operatives who were hired in secret to manage Russian President Boris Yeltsin’s election campaign in 1996. He’s polling at 6 percent with the election a few months away. First, they must get someone’s attention; they succeed finally with Yeltsin’s daughter, then it’s polling, focus groups, messages and spin. Even as Yeltsin’s numbers go up, they are unsure who hired them and if Yeltsin’s allies have a different plan in mind than victory. When the going gets toughest, they put a spin on their stake: democracy and capitalism must win. They orchestrate the most spectacular political comeback of the twentieth century – as they “sold” Boris Yeltsin to the Russian public gaining Yeltsin’s successful re-election.
The Re-election of Russian President Boris Yeltsin at Excerpts of “Clinton Secrets” in a book by JOHN DIAMOND
The campaign tactic was their most effective strategy, greatest strength- uniquely different and vastly superior to anything Russia had ever witnessed. This strategic plan with our expertise well grounded in modern American campaigning got Yeltsin re-elected. This was simply a matter of fact that he was the best the modern world could get compared to the alternative communist and he was fully supported by the U.S.
A State Department memorandum, marked “confidential,’’ summarized then President Bill Clinton’s meeting with Yeltsin at a summit in Egypt, where Clinton told Yeltsin he ”wanted to make sure that everything the United States did would have a positive impact and nothing should have a negative impact’’ on Yeltsin’s re-election. The memo added the U. S. wanted an upcoming summit with the Russian leader to be successful to “reinforce everything that Yeltsin had done.’’

Hammer Dedication to Jalil

Excerpts of “Clinton Secrets” in a book by JOHN DIAMOND, Associated Press Writer
June 1997- Abdul-Jalil was honored as the recipient of the “Muslim of The Year” in 1997 by the Imam Warith Deen Mohammed Community, Oakland, CA
You can listen to or download Part 1 of 2 Interviews of Abdul-Jalil on AmericanMuslim360 (AM360) by Niamat Shaheed.
http://superstarmanagement.podomatic.com/entry/2013-01-16T18_20_23-08_00
https://www.box.com/s/zbt1c2j96h1agxx96wiw
Part 2 of 2 Interviews of Abdul-Jalil, Nanita Strong and Imam Wali Mohammed on AmericanMuslim360 (AM360) by Niamat Shaheed.
http://superstarmanagement.podomatic.com/entry/2013-01-16T18_45_13-08_00
https://www.box.com/s/wlj5filuyybr533hziqg
July 1996-  “Community Movement Toward Improvement” Music Conference at Clara Muhammed School & Masjidul Waritheen
“Community Movement Toward Improvement” Music Conference at Clara Muhammed School and Masjidul Warithdeen in Oakland, California featuring MC Hammer, Martin Wyatt-KGO TV, Mohammed (MTV Real World-SF),Sway, Imani, Davey D, Raphael Saadiq- Tony Toni Tone, Greg Khalid Peck- Warner Bros, Karen Lee- Warner Bros Music, Eric B, Rico Cassanova, Abdul-Jalil, Tony Collins- Giant Records, Anita Greathouse-Knight, Gene Shelton, Lenny Williams, Thembisa Mshaka, Roy Tesfaye-Death Row Records shown in ABC-TV news clip.

1993 – Present, National Football League Super Bowl

In 1994 Awarded Silver Cross Pen and Pencil Set for “Distinguished Marketing and Promotional Services” to National Football League Super Bowl and “NFL Experience” by NFL Properties.

1993-97  Co-Promoted, Managed and Trained Evander Holyfield including fights versus Riddick Bowe Heavyweight Title Boxing Matches

1980- Founded COMPUTER INTELLIGENCE
In 1980 founded COMPUTER INTELLIGENCE, (COIN), the worlds first Authorized Minority IBM and Apple
Computer dealer; is a complete computer integration, network, communications, sales, service and systems company. Established certified educational, corporate and government market specialist that provide custom integrated computer systems, design, networks, Auto CAD/CAE, Desktop Publishing, Internet training, consulting, programming, maintenance, and software training to Pac Bell, State of California, PG&E, City of Oakland, Univ. of California, Sandia Labs, EBMUD, BART, etc. They are Apple and IBM Certified Educational Specialist;  Business, Legal and Accounting Office specialist;  Web Commerce specialist; Local Area Network specialist; and repair technicians.
In 1987 his computer store was burglarized by members of the City of Oakland Police Department, including Neuman Ng and Kailey Wong. He took his case to the District Attorney’s office, homicide division to conduct the investigation that lead to the arrest and conviction of two policemen for the rash of bomb burglaries and sentenced.
1983-  Commercials for City of Oakland “Conference On Urban Economic Development”
Originated, Executive Produced, Engineered, and Administered polling and analysis of Oakland Urban Economic Development survey for the City of Oakland; Wrote, Executive Produced, Produced, Directed, Edited and broadcast commercials for City of Oakland “Conference On Urban Economic Development”.

1982 –  City of Oakland Image Campaign “I know You’ll Love Oakland” Commercials
Originated, Executive Produced, Engineered, and Administered polling and analysis of Oakland City image survey for the City of Oakland; Co-Wrote, Executive Produced, Co-Produced, and Edited theme song “I know You’ll Love Oakland”; Wrote, Executive Produced, Produced, Directed, Edited and broadcast commercials for City of Oakland Image Campaign “I know You’ll Love Oakland”. Acknowledgement from ” CITY Of OAKLAND “

March 1979- The Historic BALSA 1979 National Law Convention
The historic Black American Law Students Association, 11th Annual National Convention, March 28-April 1, 1979, Hyatt, Oakland, was themed: “The Reconstruction of Black Civilizations.” Dedicated to- Rev. Ben Chavis of the Wilmington Ten, Introduction- Mayor Lionel Wilson, Keynote Speaker- Min. Louis Farrakhan, with veritable “Who’s Who” of nations leading Black presenters: Junius Williams-Pres. NBA, Hon. Ben Travis, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, Don Warden (Khalid al-Mansour), Dave Wilmont-Georgetown Law Center; Howard Moore, Alfred Slocum- Rutgers School of Law, Angela Davis, Victor Goode- Ex. Dir. NCBL, Hon. Judith Ford, Herb Reed- Howard School of Law, Asa Hilliard, Nathan Hare, Ron Baily- Northwestern University, Michael Ashburne, David Hall- FTC, Denice Carty Bernia- North Eastern University; Moot Court Judges: Hon. Wiley Manuel, Hon. Clinton White, Hon. David Cunningham, Hon. Allen Broussard, with “Thanks” to -John Burris, Peter Cohen, Claude Ames, Robert Harris, Eva Patterson, George Holland.
1974 – Creator, Executive Producer, Producer, and Host Cable Television Show “The Super Stars”
In 1974 he Created, Executive Produced, Produced, and Hosted the worlds first cable television sports talk show that was distributed around the world. The show has hosted and been hosted by many of the worlds greatest athletes, entertainers, performing artist, and celebrities.
Articles and citations available upon request.

EDUCATION:
1972-73 Stanford University Graduate School of Business, Stanford, California; Candidate for Degree of Masters in Business Administration.
1968-71 University of California School of Business, Berkeley, California, Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and Policy. Minor in Educational Psychology and Sociology.
HONORS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
~ Graduated from High School with honors,~ Deans List at U.C. Berkeley,~ Ford Foundation Scholar and COGME Fellowship Award at Stanford University Graduate School of Business,~ Federal Law Review, 1987,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO “, United States Registry, 1990,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO IN CALIFORNIA “, California Historical Society, 1982,~ Enshrined in ” OUTSTANDING YOUNG MEN OF AMERICA “ United States Jaycees, 1982,~ Enshrined in ” WHO’S WHO IN ELECTRONICS”, United States Registry, 1989,~ Acknowledgement from ” CITY Of OAKLAND “, Oakland, CA.  1982,~ Acknowledgement from ” UNITED STATES CONGRESS, 7TH DISTRICT “, Oakland, CA.  1974,

OF INTEREST:
~ Only person to graduate from University of California, Berkeley in 2.5 years and achieve letters in three academic disciplines; Business Administration, Educational Psychology, and Sociology,~ Took and passed one full year class load in one college academic quarter!,~ Recognized for Genius I.Q.~ College Commitment Counselor, ~As a senior founded a Minority Scholar-Athlete Admissions Program at U. C. Berkeley, ~Had completed 1.5 years of 2 year MBA program before entering Stanford Graduate School of Business as a result of Undergraduate Business Degree from Cal Berkeley, ~Started own business while at Stanford and still operates it as a corporation today over 35 years later, ~Founded the “Community Food Bank” through the Margaret & Aaron Wallace Foundation to provide food and meals for the needy in 1992 to continue a similar program started by his father in the 1950’s.

Beauford Delaney’s Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971

OF NOTE:
~ In 1971 Abdul-Jalil had his portrait painted by world renowned artist Beauford Delaney- “Portraitist of the Famous”, the most important African-American artists of the 20th century! He has painted portraits of Emperor Halle Selassie of Ethiopia, W.E.B. Du Bois, John F. Kennedy, Salvadore Dalí, James Baldwin, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Josephine Baker,  Langston Hughes, Robert Kennedy, Marian Anderson, Jacob Lawrence, Ella Fitzgerald, Pablo Picasso, Charlie Parker, James Jones, Jean Genet, Ethel Waters, Cab Calloway, W.C. Handy, Countee Cullen, Henry Miller, Jean-Claude Killy, Herb Gentry, Alain Locke, Cy Twombly, Sterling Brown, Georgia O’Keeffe, Augusta Savage, Stuart Davis, Richard A. Long, John Koenig, Jackson Pollock, Vassili Pikoula, Henri Chahine, Lawrence Calcagno, Elaine DeKooning, Palmer C. Hayden, Darthea Speyer, Herbert Gentry, Ed Clark, James Jones. Henry Miller, Richard Wright, Jacob Lawrence, to name a few! 

Delaney was a respected elder of the Harlem Renaissance crowd. His intimate portraits from this period show his beliefs of love, respect and equality between all people. In this time he became a “spiritual father” to writer James Baldwin; a rare kindred spirit who was both African American and gay. Delaney’s biographer David Leeming observes, ”’He kept his life in compartments – safe politics with most whites, strong race identification with blacks”

Delaney, whose life appeared to symbolize the mythical artistic existence of privation and relative obscurity, that show a retrospective of “uninhibited colorist (though never an unintelligent one)” that is “apotheosized” and whose talent and “free, open and outgoing nature” engendered admiration from everyone whom was fortunate enough to encounter him as he was THE darling of the international culture scene in New York and Paris. James Baldwin called him his “spiritual father.”

THE Great, amazing and invariable Beauford Delaney’s masterpieces are trumpeted as cutting-edge work in Black aesthetics, stylistic evolution from representation to pure abstraction, with new and radical theories with his techniques and expression of the politics of Black arts, affording him his very own, singular serious stature among abstract expressionists, transforming the critical landscape into a growing interest in his creation of “Black Abstraction”!

For more than a decade, Delaney showed compelling, vibrant images of energetic life: produced engaging abstract works, portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light, powerful works of art and culture, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day.

The fascinating Beauford Delaney is a Modern artist who produced engaging portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of New York life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light following his move to Paris in 1953, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day! 

I AM ETERNALLY GRATEFUL!!!

Abdul-Jalil

SPORTS:
Lettered in Football, Basketball, Track and Field in High School. Lettered in Basketball, Track and Field at University of California. N.C.A.A. Champions in Track and Field in 1971.

FOUNDER, PRODUCER:
“The Evening of Elegance” Oakland, CA, 1997-Host; CMS Community Food Bank, Oakland, 1996; “The Stars”, Cable TV Show, Oakland, CA, 1974; Montgomery Wards Pre-Reserve Training Program, Richmond, CA,1974; Montgomery Wards “Super Sunday”, Richmond, CA,1974; Montgomery Wards “Men Only Night”, Richmond, CA, 1973; Bay Area Black Expo, Oakland, CA, 1972-77; Congress of Athletes For Alternatives to Youths, 1972; Martin Luther King Basketball Classic, l972; California Fashion and Beauty Pageant, 1975.
ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS:
~ National Lawyers Guild, ~ Muslim Bar Association of New York, ~ Houston Muslim Lawyers , ~ National Muslim Law Students Association, ~ Association of Muslim-American Lawyers, ~ Associate Board Member- University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business East Bay Alumni Network

* * TESTIMONIALS ON ABDUL-JALIL * *

Emanuel Steward on Jalil
Emanuel Steward, Evander Holyfield, and Hammer in ring with Heavyweight Title Belts

“The Man who turns hits into MILLION$.” – The Tribune.
“You really are the BEST.” – L. BOSTOCK, California Angels.
“GOD sent me an Angel” – M.C. HAMMER.
“Smart Youth, most intriguing, has the Baseball world at his feet.” – N.Y. POST .

“Thanks for getting the Deal DONE Jalil!”- Evander “Real Deal” Holyfield, the only boxer in history to win the undisputed championship in two weight classes (cruiserweight in the late 1980s and at heavyweight in the early 1990s).

Reggie’s Prayer

“Jalil, I told everybody that you guys are representing me!”- Reggie “the Minister of Defense” White, two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year, Super Bowl XXXI champion, 13-time Pro Bowl, holds second place all-time among NFL career sack leaders with 198 (behind Bruce Smith’s 200 career sacks). He was selected to the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team, NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, and the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team. White is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Deion “Prime Time” Sanders playing with Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Falcons at the same time!

“You are going to have to deal with him (Jalil) now!”- Deion “Prime Time” Sanders to Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Hawks former President and General Manager Stan Kasten and Atlanta Braves General Manager John Schuerholz

“I don’t know what I would have done without you!.” – J.C. WATTS, U.S. HOUSE of REPRESENTATIVES.
“Thanks for directing me to the Sonics.” – GUS WILLIAMS, NBA.
“Imaginative, foresighted, some pretty impressive credentials. His I.Q. QUALIFIES HIM AS A GENIUS.” – UPI .
“That’s the finest promotion job for an unknown athlete that I have ever seen.” – N.Y. JETS.
“I’m so happy!! I’m full of money!!” – C. ROBINSON, NBA.
“He is personable, unafraid, confident. and athletes are attracted to him” – D. MAGGARD, U.S. Olympic Committee.
“You have never been wrong” – EMANUEL STEWARD, Boxing
“He told me what he wanted, we shook hands. We made the deal in 5 minutes.” – B. BAVASI, California Angels

SPORTS:
Lettered in Football, Basketball, Track and Field in High School. Lettered in Basketball, Track and Field at University of California. N.C.A.A. Champions in Track and Field in 1971.

FOUNDER, PRODUCER:
“The Evening of Elegance” Oakland, CA, 1997-Host; CMS Community Food Bank, Oakland, 1996; “The Stars”, Cable TV Show, Oakland, CA, 1974; Montgomery Wards Pre-Reserve Training Program, Richmond, CA,1974; Montgomery Wards “Super Sunday”, Richmond, CA,1974; Montgomery Wards “Men Only Night”, Richmond, CA, 1973; Bay Area Black Expo, Oakland, CA, 1972-77; Congress of Athletes For Alternatives to Youths, 1972; Martin Luther King Basketball Classic, l972; California Fashion and Beauty Pageant, 1975.
ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS:
~ National Lawyers Guild, ~ Muslim Bar Association of New York, ~ Houston Muslim Lawyers , ~ National Muslim Law Students Association, ~ Association of Muslim-American Lawyers, ~ Associate Board Member- University of California, Ber

CAECAY Maximizing Athletes, Entertainers, Celebrities and Influencers Brand Potential

Congress of Athletes Entertainers and Celebrities Creating Alternatives for Youths (CAECAY) Maximizing Athlete’s Brand Potential

In today’s evolving landscape of sports and entertainment, the ability for college student athletes to monetize their Name, Image and Likeness (NIL) has opened up unprecedented opportunities. The Congress of Athletes Entertainers and Celebrities Creating Alternatives for Youths (CAECAY), in collaboration with the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation (AMWF), Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, Superstarmanagement.com, Superstar Management, Ex-why AdVentures, ex-why.com, Nowtruth.org, and Nowtruth, aims to leverage their collective 50 years of experience to support athletes, entertainers, celebrities, and influencers in maximizing their earning potential through NIL initiatives. CAECAY and its affiliated platforms are established as industry leaders in assisting athletes, entertainers, celebrities, and influencers in monetizing their NIL. This marketing plan outlines strategies to effectively promote and harness the power of NIL for these individuals.

Julia Foxx

Objectives:

Educate and guide student athletes on the benefits, legalities, and best practices of NIL monetization.

Facilitate brand partnerships and endorsement opportunities for athletes and influencers.

Generate awareness and engagement through targeted marketing campaigns.

Drive revenue growth for individuals involved in the program.

Target Audience:

College student athletes looking to monetize their personal brand through NIL initiatives.

Brands and businesses seeking authentic partnerships with athletes and influencers.

Sports enthusiasts and fans interested in engaging with their favorite athletes on a more personal level.

Marketing Strategies:

a) Establish an Online Presence:

Develop a comprehensive website (e.g., CAECAY.org) as a central hub for information, resources, and success stories related to NIL monetization.

Optimize the website for search engines to enhance visibility and organic traffic.

Create engaging content, including articles, blog posts, and videos, highlighting the benefits and success stories of athletes who have monetized their NIL.

b) Educational Programs and Workshops:

Organize workshops, webinars, and seminars to educate student athletes on the nuances of NIL monetization, including legal considerations, branding strategies, and contract negotiations.

Collaborate with universities, sports organizations, and player associations to deliver comprehensive educational programs.

c) Athlete Representation and Management:

Offer professional representation and management services to athletes and influencers seeking to monetize their NIL.

Provide guidance in brand development, contract negotiations, and endorsement opportunities.

Foster relationships with industry experts, including lawyers, marketers, and financial advisors, to offer comprehensive support to clients.

d) Brand Partnerships and Endorsements:

Identify and connect athletes and influencers with suitable brand partnerships and endorsement opportunities.

Develop a database of brands interested in collaborating with athletes and influencers to promote their products or services.

Leverage AMWF’s online platform, amwftrust.org, to facilitate connections between athletes, influencers, and brands.

e) Social Media and Digital Campaigns:

Utilize social media platforms to amplify the reach and engagement of athletes and influencers.

Create compelling content showcasing athletes’ personal stories, training routines, and community involvement.

Implement targeted advertising campaigns to reach specific demographics and increase brand visibility.

Measurement and Evaluation:

Track and analyze key performance indicators (KPIs) such as website traffic, social media engagement, brand partnerships secured, and revenue generated through NIL initiatives.

Conduct regular surveys and feedback sessions to gather insights from athletes, influencers, and brand partners.

Use analytics tools to monitor the effectiveness of marketing campaigns and make data-driven adjustments.

Budget Allocation:

Allocate a budget for website development and maintenance, content creation, social media advertising, event organization, and educational programs.

Regularly review and optimize the budget based on the effectiveness of each initiative.

With the recent changes allowing college student athletes to monetize their NIL, there is a significant opportunity for CAECAY, AMWF, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, and their affiliated platforms to provide guidance and support to athletes, entertainers, celebrities, and influencers. By implementing a strategic marketing plan that focuses on establishing an online presence, delivering educational programs, facilitating brand partnerships, and leveraging digital campaigns, CAECAY can help maximize the earning potential of individuals in the NIL era. This approach will not only empower athletes and influencers but also create mutually beneficial relationships with brands and enhance fan engagement.

To enjoy these benefits, join CAECAY’s “ICONS CHARITY REGISTRAR”, go to“Matching Charitable Philanthropic Organizations with ICONS”:  https://caecay.org/matching-charitable-philanthropic-organizations-with-icons/ or “Matching ICONS with Charitable Philanthropic Organizations”:  https://caecay.org/matching-icons-with-charitable-philantropic-organizations/ Oaklanders Honored for Work In Haiti, Free Logo Design and Business Strategic Plan; YOUR Free Food Program; Entertainment Jobs Feb. 2012- March 2012
Abdul-Jalil and crew were nominated for an EMMY with “OUT. The Glenn Burke Story”, and although they did not win it, they have already won several major honors for it and expect more.
*****
1unknownname Dr. Kenya Numan and her organization “Stepping Together” as well as Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim and “The Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation” were recently honored in Miami, Florida and Port Au Prince, Haiti in July 2011 for the Relief Missions that they have sent to Haiti since the earthquake. The incomparable Dr. Numan has served in the Gulf War and was a top level surgeon on the front line addressing the needs on the U.S. soldiers where word of her superior talents spread throughout the region such that even the opposition sought her out when they were detained. She has served the needs of many around the world in Africa, South and Central America, and here in the U. S.
A very special “Thanks” to all that have supported our efforts over the years!
On August 25, 2010 Abdul-Jalil received the letter shown below of “Thanks” from Arch Bishop Joel Jeune of Grace Village in Haiti for the Relief Mission they received from the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together on behalf of The World Conference of Mayors (WCM- 18,000 Political Leaders and Dignitaries from around the world) and The National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM). This is a tangible reality of SUCCESS in Haiti for ALL the members of the organizations world-wide rather than the many idle cocktail party rants and raves of projects that exist without any substance behind them. THEY DID IT! ALL the members of the World Conference of Mayors can celebrate their success and acknowledge their contribution.
They are now moving forward in a meaningful way to secure financial, subsistence, construction and medical aid and support for the next mission which will take place as soon as we can unite to raise the necessary items just mentioned. They can tap into the resources of the USAIDS and the National Medical Association to make great progress in securing bi-weekly missions to various needed areas around the World!
The Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation,¿eX-whY AdVentures?,Presents,James Ahmed Rasheed,Entourage,Trader Joes’s,Capt.,Randy Holland,drums,Tribute to Legends of Jazz Show, May,2012, 2:00 PM,4:00 PM,Trader,Joes’s, 2742 Pinole Valley Road, Pinole,#occupyoakland, #OWS, Pain, signatures, 106th Ave, 11 other musicians to form Zongo Junction, 11th St, 14th Ave, 1972, 20 year, 24/7, 25th season, 4 Minutes, 80′s, @amwft, @nowtruth, a best-seller, a blues-drenched gem that swings with dazzling aplomb, a commentary, a complaint against, a four-alarm fire, A girl I can love forever, a Harlem Renaissance Award, a holiday tradition, a huge success, a letter from me to my fans about what’s going on in my life, a lost art, a memorable concert, a modern nine-piece afrobeat band, a movie from Focus Features about the life of Fela was made for release in 2010, a musician from Nigeria, a night like no other, a series of, a shrine was built in his honor, a spectacle to be remembered, A Tribe Called Quest, A.M.E., A.M.E. Oakland Mass Choir, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, about a failed romantic relationship, About Jazz, about the way relationships should go, acclaimed, accomplished, accomplishing, Accra, achieved platinum status, acknowledging, across the expanse, acting, activism, Actor, Adam Coopersmith, adaptation, administratively, adopted, African highlife music, African-American, African-American youth, Afro, afrobeat, afrobeat pioneer, against political corruption in his native country, age of 14, ahead of its time, ajalil, Al, Al Green, al-Hakim removed, Alameda, Alameda City Manager, Alameda County, Alameda County district attorney, Alameda County Superior Court, album, album debut, All, All About Jazz, Allen Stone, already well and truly assured, alumni, america, Amiri Baraka, among many other honors, Amp Live, AMWFTrust.org, An All-Star Tribute to Maze, an analyst, an example, an icon, and current District Attorney Nancy E. O’Malley, anthem, anticipated, Antonio Dixon, apartheid, appellation, appointed, appointment, Arabic word, Architects, ARE NOT the constituents, Ariel Vento, around the world, Arrested Development, arsenal, Art, art form, artist, artists face, at the forefront, At the same time, Atlantic Records, atmospheric, attend music programs, attended, ATTENTION, attorney, Attorneys, audacious, Avant, Average White Band, away, AWB, Babyface, backstabbing, Badu, Baduizm, ballads, band, band members, Banks, bare his emotions, bargain away, bassist, Baton Rouge, Bay Area, Bay Area hip hop, Bay Area production, Be there or be square, beat-boxer back, beating him badly, beatmasters, beautiful, Becca Burrington, becomes real, Bedrock, before evolving, began getting airplay, beginnings, believed her original name to be her ‘slave’ name, beloved, Ben Harper, Ben Vereen, Benny Green, Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble, Berklee College of Music, Best Choreography, Best Costume Design for a Musical, best jazzwomen, Best Sound Design for a Musical, Beyonce, beyond, Big Band, BIG BUSINESS INTEREST, Bilal, Billboard, Billboard’s, blend of old soul, bluesmen, bob dylan, Bob Marley, bodies, Body Police, book, Booker T. and the MGs, bootlicking, Born and raised, born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Born Kevin Moore, Boston, Brandy, Break Ya Back, Brian Culbertson, brightest, bring a message of faith, Bringing across another character was so much fun, Broadway show, Broadway the following year, broken down, Brooklyn, Brooklyn’s, Brownsville Express, Bryson, building, bus stop, But if she kissed him, but lips don’t lie, but you don’t want to come off like you’re trying to be someone else, by Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, by virtue of, Ca., California State Appeals Court, California Supreme Court, Cambridge Folk Fest 2004, cameo, can do no wrong, Can I Make Love, Can’t Dodge Fraud, capable of stirring the deepest emotions, Capitol, career, career-evolving, Carl Thomas, Carolyn Walter, carpet baggers, Carson, case, cast of characters, cause, cause the demise of a relationship, caused by, caution to the fellas, cautionary tale, cautious message, CDBaby, celebrates, celebrities, cemented its status, Center for the Arts, center stage, Change It All, Change Me, change the spelling of her name, chart-toppers, chicago, Choreographed, chose to cover it up, chosen to pay homage, Chris Brown, Christina Aguilera, christmas, Christy Dana, church-honed, cinematic, city, City Attorney’s from Oakland, Civil Gang Injunctions, claiming, classic, classic soul, classic tale, clergy, Cleveland, Cleveland School of the Arts, close friends, Closer, club debu, club jam, co-produced, co-wrote, cohesiveness, collection of all original down home, collectively, color and culture, Colors, Colors of Christmas, commitment, community, company, complex style of music, compromised by, concentrate on her music, concert, concerts and presentations annually, Conductor, constant three year barrage, contemporary jazz artist, contemporary music, contemporary R&B, contingent of established, continued, continued Corruption, cooperation, Corruption, Corruption Charges, cosmic connection, cosmic unit of energy, could have been avoided, Councilmen Reid, country’s most artistically adventurous, County, court, court order, Courthouse, cover of, cover up, crafted, crafts, created by Bill T. Jones, created his own dance, creative force in nature, Creative Partners, credits, Critics, Cronyism, Crooked former Oakland City Attorney John Russo, croons, crowds, Crystal Bryant, CSAA, Culbertson, culture of corruption, curfew, curfews, Curran Theatre, current mission, D. A. Bob Conner, D.C., DA, Dallas, Damon Thomas, Dan Siegle, dance, dancing at every show, Darker Side Of The Moon, Dave Brandwein, Dave Chappelle, David E. Talbert, David Grisman, David Grisman Quintet, Davies, Davies Symphony Hall, day-to-day, DC, Dead Prez, debacle, debut album, decided to be a musician, decided to sign, declares, deep rhythm, Def Poetry Jam, defies, DeLaFuente, demo, denial of justice, deny justice, depending on the advice, Deputy District Attorney Kevin Dunleavy, derives from, destined to become, destroying his studio, Detroit, developer partners, did Mayor Ron Dellums or City Attorney John Russo investigate the many alleged charges of abuse against former Oakland Police Department Chief Anthony Batts before they hired him and was that a factor, die-hard fans, different textures of music excite me, directed, director, director Jeffery Williams, disavow their very own ethnic orientation, disenfranchised, disposed, distributed, District, District Attorney Nancy O’Malley, diverse acts, dj culture, do not represent their interest, documents the incredible true story of Fela Kuti, dominate, don’t ever take a romantic relationship for granted, double crooked, doubles as, Drama Desk, dramatically portrayed, draws on his inner, Dreamgirls, drew close comparisons, driving piano riff, drummer, drummer Charles Ferguson, Duke Ellington, duplicitous, dvd, Dwele, dynamic performances, D’Angelo, E-40, each new album, early youth, echoing the frustration felt by the people of the East Bay Area, eclectic mix of funk influences, Ecstasy, Edmonds, effortlessly, Elbo Room, elected officials, electrifying, electro-pop funk, eliminated, Ellen Seeling, Ellia English, embodies the wealth of Brooklyn’s musical diversity, emergency, emerging, emerging artist, emotionally powerful, Emotionally told though music, employ black gospel music, energetic, engineered, entire good of some lives, entitled, EP, Eric Dawkins, Erica to Erykah, Erica Wright, Erika Oba, Erykah, Erykah Badu, Erykah Free, Essence, essential African-American legacy, et al, ethereal, evaluating, Even Closer, eventually, EVERY act of difference, evidence by al-Hakim, Ex-Why, expanding his creative horizons, explain, exposed California, exposed Govenor Jerry Brown Covering up, exposing Presiding Judge Jon Rolfenson, exposure of the criminal actions, express the power of spirit, fact laden reports of fraud and corruption, families, fans, Fantasia, fantasy, fear factor, featured, features, features the incredible legacy of music he left behind, featuring, f
eaturing Frankie Beverly, Feel My Soul, feel-good, Feels like I’m walking on water, Fela, Fela also tried to run for President in Nigeria’s first elections in over ten years, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Fela died in 1997, Fela will live forever, Fela! has been nominated for 11 Tony Awards, Fela! was first performed off-Broadway in 2008, Fela’s mother was killed during the attack, Fela’s music was re-released, fellow soulster, festive costumes, fighting, Filipina singer and actress, Fillmore Street, finally arrived on the big stage, finger-snappin, first act signed, first album, following Oakland’s lead, for gentrifying the inner-city, Force of Nature, FORCED OUT, forced to resign, Forecast, formal Corruption Fraud Complaint, former City Attorney John Russo, former District Attorney Tom Orloff, former Oakland and current San Leandro City Attorney Jayne Williams, Forum, fought for civil rights, Founded in 1911, founding members, Fourth album, framework, Frank Vignola Duo, fraud, FREE TICKETS, free-styling, fresh collaborators, fresh energy, from the comfort of your home, from the deep South, full length, function as one organic, funk, Funkadelic, funkiest, fused with, fusing many different styles, gained underground respect, gained visibility, Galapagos Arts Center, Galaxy Smith Digital Media Collective, Galaxysmith.com, gang related, Gave Case File To Stephan Barber, gave me the drive, Gaye, Geary St, Geffen, Genny Lim, Geoff Hoyle, George Lucas, german, get-down, gets audiences riled up, Ghana, Gil Scott-Heron, Gil Scott-Herron, given away, giving back, GOAPELE, gold-certified, gone on air, Goodbye, Gospel Ensemble, Grammy Foundation, Grammy nominations, grandparents, Grant Green, great, Great American Music Hall, gritty funk instrumentals, gritty takes on tunes, groove, grooves, grown artistically as a unit, Guiding, guitarist, Had Enough, hailed as, Hakim, hang, Harry Belafonte, Harvey Mason Jr., has enriched the police department with over $12 million, has over 87, has won three, hbo, he was also described as a combination of James Brown, he was suppose to Investigate, headlining, heart, heavy brand of raw funk power, helmed, help of Will and Jada Pinkett-Smith, Henry, Henry St. Clair Fredericks, her cousin, her effort to prompt a conflict of interest charge, her popularity increased dramatically, Heralded, high energy funk band, high-profile gigs, highlight, highlights, hip hop, hip-hop crews, hip-hop side of R&B, his best loved tunes, his career progressed, his music, his music got more political, his musical and political legacy still live on strong, hits, holiday hits, Holliday, holocaust, home town, hope, Hot 16, Hot 8 Brass Band, Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, https://NowTruth.Org/, hypnotic flow, I finally found someone, I have to say, I Want Tickets, I won’t be complacent, Ignacio, Ignacio DeLaFuente, imagery, implored others, implores everyone, impossible is easy to do, In a nutshell, in his own right, in solidarity and union, in the 1960-70′s re-evolution, In the Nick of Tyme, in the vein, inability, include, included, increasingly digital world, India.Arie, individual talents, individuals, Influence, influence peddlers, influenced by Nigerian superstar, informing all, infusion, injunction, injunction/curfew, innovative arts institutions, inspiration behind, inspired, inspired by the force, inspired solos, instrumentation, Insurance Companies, intimate understanding, introduced, Introduced by, intuitive whole, investigate, investigation of corruption, irrefutable evidence, Irreplaceable, is to be considered worthless and disposable, Ise Lyfe, Ishmael Reed Band, isn’t afraid, It has been said that hip-hop would not exist without Fela’s music, It’s free and communal, it’s a perfect disguise, it’s about giving people great music, It’s OK if she said she was out with her girls, it’s time to create another, I’m always fighting to go further, I’m just getting started, I’m not where I want to be yet, I’m out to raise, I’ve got that niche, Jada Pinkett Smith, jam, James Brown, James Poyser, Jamie Foxx, Jamiroquai, Jay-Z, jazz, jazz and hip-hop, Jazziz Magazine, JBs, Jean Fineberg, Jeff Bhasker, Jeffery Williams, Jennifer, Jennifer Holliday, Jennifer Hudson, Jill Scott, joining, Jones, Joshua Redman, journey, joy to the country, Judge Jon Tigar, Judges, judicial, JUNCTION, justice, Justin Timberlake, kah, Kajun, Kasey Knudsen, Keb, Keb’ Mo, Keith Carson, KeKe Wyatt, Kelly Clarkson, Kennedy Center, Kenny, Keri Hilson, keyboards, Keyshia Cole, Kim, Kiss, Kiss Goodbye, Knitting Factory, know, known to al-Hakim, KRS-One, KT Nelson, la, label, labeled the recording, lady, laments, language, languid, Larry, Larry Reid, latest album, Lauryn Hill, law enforcement, law firm, Le Poisson Rouge, Lea, Lea Salonga, Lea Salonga-Chien, lead single, lead to, Leathers, Leela James, Legacy Entertainment, Legal, legend, legendary Billie Holiday, legendary performances, Leslie Ann Jones, letter, Lil Wayne, lilting tenor, Linda Perry, line, links, Listen, listening, live shows received continual praise, live television feed, living link, local radio station, long been known for, los angeles, losing, loss, Love, love ballads, love child, Love Me Right, love songs, Ludacris, lush, lust, Luther Vandross, lyrics, MA, MacArthur Blvd., Mad Duran, madcap characters, made himself a witness in this case, Maggie Takeda, Magic Johnson, Magic Johnson Music, maintaining the status quo, Makin’ Good Love, Malcolm Jamaal Werner, man, Mara Fox, Margery Williams, Marian McPartland, Marin County, Marina Garza, Marshall, Marshall Leathers, Martin Luther, Marvin, marvin gaye, Mary J. Blige, Mary Lou, Mary Lou Williams Festival, Maryland, mass fraud, masterpiece, Maxwell, Maybe I Deserve, MCA, McKinley Morganfield, means, melding traditional West African rhythms with Funk, melodic, members, meticulous sharpshooters including pianist, mid-tempo, mid-tempo groove, Mike City, Mike Tiger, millions of dollars, Minority, Miriam Makeba, Miss Saigon, Mission Street, Missy Elliott, mixes, MJM, MJM debut album, MO, modern R&B, Montclair, Montclair Women’s, Montclair Women’s Big Band, mood, mood-setting number, Moore, more rampant corruption, morning-after, Morris Chesnut, mos def, most are reacting, move the concerned, moved to New York after High School, Movement, MPC, MTT, much to the chagrin of the Nigerian government, Muddy Waters, Muhammad Ali, multi-cultural membership, multi-faceted, multi-racial, multiple styles, murder, Music, Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas, music from the great Ellington songbook, music that will make you want to dance in the aisles, musical, musical film, musical message, musical roots, Musicians, music’s mainstream, Must Resign, MWBB, My First Love, my struggles as a man, my the admissions made by District Attorney Nancy O’Malley to him, My Thoughts, N’dambi, Nancy, National Public Radio, natural creative force, naturally, nba, Nepotism, Network, NEVER return, Never thought it would happen for me, new, new compositions, new heights, new school, new team, new technology, new voice of ghetto soul, new voice of modern soul, New Year’s, new york city, New York University, New York’s most illustrious venues, Nicole Sherzinger, Night Life, Nina Simone, NO MORE, No. 4 hit, nor represent, notes, Nothing in This World, Novellus Theater, November, now famous, Now or Never, now the whole world is chanting the same tune, now we have to show more action, NowTruth.Org, number one syndicated show, nursery rabbit, O, O’Malley, Oakland, Oakland City Attorney John Russo, Oakland City Attorney Resigns, Oakland City Councilmen, Oakland Interfaith, Oakland Interfaith Gospel Ensemble, Oakland Mass Choir, Oakland Mayor Jean Quan, Oakland Police Department, Oakland Police Department has FAILED to comply with the Federal Mandate to meet MINIMUM agreed upon standards to fight corruption, Obie, Occupy, Occupy Communities, OCCUPY Movements, OCCUPY OAKLAND, OCCUPY RE-EVOLUTION, OCCUPY WALL STREET, Occupyers, ODC, ODC/Dance, Olivier, Omar Sosa Afreecanos Quartet, Omarion, Once you hit a plateau, one of America’s most exciting cont
emporary dance companies, one of the most formidable jazz ensembles on the West Coast, one of the presumed reasons for Oakland Police Department Chief Anthony Batts resigning, One question being asked now, ongoing case, ongoing evolution, online community, open for, or his music, Orchestra, orchestral, ordered al-Hakim, orginal 5-member band, Orgone, original instrumentals, original keyboardist, originally, originating the lead role, Oscar Grant, other producers, Outer Critics, outstanding soloists, over a million people came to the funeral chanting, overall Minority Youth Community, owned and controlled by developers, P-Funk, pairing up, Parents, partner, partner in crime, partnered with, party, pattern, Peabo, Peabo Bryson, peace, Pentagon, people they do not talk to, perfect amount of holiday cheer, perfomance, Performers, performing in a hip-hop act, performing traditional Christmas favorites, personnel, Peter Apfelbaum, pianist, Piano Jazz, pink, pink floyd, pioneered Afro beat music, place amongst today’s elite female soul artists of the world, planet, platinum, platinum-certified albums, played together for years, playing music together virtually since they were all still in diapers, playlists, playwright, Please be advised that Fela! has loud sound effects, Please Don’t Go, political, political activist, Political Suicide, politically and socially inspired songs, pop hits, positive change, post, power brokers, powerful narration, predecessors, premier male vocalists, prepares to release, primary sound, Prince, Private Room, problems, proclaim widely and loudly, produced, produced by, Producer, producer and songwriter, producers, production team, project, promote action, proof, proud to present, Public Assembly, publicly denounce, quiet melody, R&B, R&B classic, R&B hit, R&B legend Frankie Beverly, R&B music, R. Kelly, Rachelle Ferrell, radio, radio station, radio-friendly, ranks, re-emerging, Reaching No. 1, Read Your Mind, ready to ascend, Real Estate, real estate developers dream tools, realities of life, realm, recorded, recorded by, recording, Records, refused to investigate it, regarding the incident where she had al-Hakim removed from the D. A.’s office while sitting alone in the lobby waiting for a meeting, Reid, Reid was served, Reid’s developers serving claims, relatable introspections, release, remarkable successes, René & Angela, renewed confidence, repeatedly, represent, Rescue, resenting that media manipulation, residency, resourceswar, returned the favor, revealed, revealing, revelation, revelatory, revitalized, rhythm section, rhythms, Richard Nichols, right, rigorously blended for high mileage and maximum pleasure, Riverside, Rolling Stone, romance, romantic, romantic crooner, romantic liaison, rooted sense, Ropers Majeski, Roscoe Mitchell, Roy Hargrove, Rubben Studdard, Russ Gold, Russell Simmons, Russo, Ruth Davies, Sa-Ra, Sade, Salonga, same stance taken, san francisco, San Francisco Bay Area, San Francisco Symphony, San Leandro, Sandre Swanson, Sarah Cline, Saul Williams, saxes, saying, says, scoring, seamlessly, searing live sets, See you done got a lot of passes, segued, select group of singers, self schooled, self-explanatory, self-titled, self-titled album, sellouts, seminal Delta blues, sensational singers, sense of humor, sense of swing, sensual, Separated, serene, serious crime, serve as a model for what is possible among all people, settles, several musical shows showcasing his story and life hit the stage, sex, Sex Music, Sex Room, sexy, SFS, shamelessly, shape their musical voice, Shawn ”Jay-Z“ Carter, She made this order without any legal proceeding, she won, She won’t show it, shift, Sick of waiting on you to change, sign the Petition To The Honorables President Barack Obama, signifies the inner self, Silky Soul Music, Simmering, simply reach out and talk, sing, singer, singer and actress, singer-songwriter, singers, Sitswana, six-month trip to Ghana, sixth album, Skies Wide Open, skillfully works his way through, skills, Skyblaze Recordings, Skylight studios, Skywalker Sound, SLIM’S, Slim’s for our annual Christmas tradition, smoke and haze effects, Snoop Dog, so-called, so-called power brokers, social, sold out, sold out audience, something to remember, Song Dynasty, songs, songstress, songwriter, sordid, soul, Soul from the U.S., Soul Sista, soul vocals, soulful, souls, sound, sounds from all over the board, soundtrack, sources have confirmed, South African, South Los Angeles, spin records, spinning it, spirit, spiritual, stage name, standing up, Stars, started calling his music Afrobeat in the late sixties, state-of-the-art, stations, stereotypes, Stevie Wonder, storied tradition, story-telling lyrics, storytelling, stresses, stretch his vocal wings, strict categorization, strobe effects, successfully managed, such talent as, Suitcase, sullied, Superior, Superstarmanagement, surname, survivors, Sutter St., sweet, swept America, Swing, Symphony, Symphony Hall, Taj Mahal, taking land from the poor, talented, talented producers, Talib Kweli, Talking Heads, talking our way out, Tammy Hall, Tank, Taylor Shell, teach children how to sing and dance, tell them what’s going on in your life, Terry Dexter, texas, Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving celebration, that corruption, that cry, That Dude, that establishes the admitted fraud committed by the D.A.’s office for over 20 years, that resulted in the only conviction of police officers crimes committed while on duty, that’s your kiss goodbye, the 13-piece ensemble, the annual Colors of Christmas concerts, The band, the band combines, The band was conceived, the Bay, The Broadway experience can be like sitting with blinders on, The Cannabinoids, The Coup, the courthouse, the creator of Fela!, The cry at ALL the Occupy events world-wide, The dabbling in other genres inspires my writing, the Developers, the documentary, The Duke Ellington Orchestra, the enduring power of love, The ensemble, The Game, The High School TourThe High School Tour, the hip hop generation, the hit single, the late, The Letter, the male equivalent, the media, the melodic backdrop, the Meters, The Minority, The mood shifts, The music of Duke Ellington, The music of Fela has also been provided by Antibalas, The musical Fela! is an incredible explosion of music, the MWBB, The New School, the next step, the North Oakland Gang Injunction HAS FAILED to reduce crime in any way, the Nowtruth.org, The Occupy Movement, the Occupyers, The Pentagon, the people of the Oakland East Bay Area, The Political Struggles of Fela, The Preacher’s Kid, The principal purpose, the principles of equality, the recording, The Regency Ballroom, the Reid Gang, the rights and interests, The Roots, the San Francisco Symphony, the singer wrote and released the single, the singer’s, the song, the sounds of his native country, the streets, the Team, The tickets, The Triumph of Fela, The Underdogs, The Velveteen Rabbit, the voice of modern soul, The World, The world witnessed as Oakland revolted and burned, theatre studies, Theatre World awards, their bagmen, their individual hits, their life, their shared inspirations, then Attorney General Jerry Brown, these self-perceived, they acknowledge that being Black in America, they are law enforcement, they constantly connive, This album, this didn’t quiet Fela, This is a show you enjoy as much with your body as with your mind, this is premium-grade big band jazz, this matter, those whom have voiced their opinions with their frustrations in a varied manner of ways, three-time Grammy winner, through, through situations, throwing away, tied together, Tiffany Carrico, tight ensemble work, Tim Grace, timeless music, to avoid having to investigate and prosecute the complaint, to exemplify through interfaith, to manifest truth and light, to the world, to write, toe-tappin, Tony, top 10 singles, top 20 single, top 5, top five hit, top-rated, tough, toured Europe, tracks, tracks comprising, tradition, traditional xylophone technique, transcend time, transcendental, translated from Muslim, traveled up the Mississippi River, Trey Songz, tried to place al-Haki
m in a life threatening situation, trivialize, trombones, trombonists, trumpeters, trumpets, Turkuaz, turncoats, Twitter, two-time Grammy Award winning, Uncle Tom, under the threat of arrest, underbelly, underground, unique relationship between a little boy and his stuffed rabbit, uniquely tangible, United States Attorney General Eric Holder, unity, universal life force, universally celebrated, university, unrest, unsheathes, urban, urban radio, Usher, Van Ness Ave., Velveteen Rabbit, versatile, Verve, Verve Forecast, very successful session musician, veteran producer, Vibe, victim, video of al-Hakim, violence, vivid cast, vivid storytelling, voicemail, void, waiting for a meeting, Waking up late with you on my mind, Walking on Water, want-to-be-leaders, wants the injunction/curfews, was initially going to be a doctor, Washington, Watch the story with video and documents, Watch video of al-Hakim, We are ALL Oscar Grant, Website, wedding, well received from the start, well-worn, We’ve been used to, WGCI, what eventually became known as his own distinct, what you write to people, what’s going through my head, When I’m with you, Where Did We Go, which continued to infuriate the government, while al-Hakim, Who are they protecting and why, who attacked the commune where Fela lived, Will Bernard, Will Smith, Williams, Williams College, Williamsburg, Williamstown, without sacrificing, without sounding boring, Wiz Khalifa, woman’s desire, Women’s Big Band, won a MacArthur Genius Award, worked with, world, world-class ensemble, woven into the fabric of this country’s artistic legacy, writes, wrote the play book, Wyatt, XII album, xzwhy, YBCA, Yerba Buena, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, yet claim to bargain and speak for them, Yoshi’s, Yoshisjazz, you can watch, You don’t want to let your fans down, you know it’s a lie, You Mean that Much, you want to stay relevant, You won’t know it, young hip-hop duo, young player, Youth, Yvonne Line, Zion I, ZONGO, Zongo Junction

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim Exemplifies Beauford Delaney’s Masterful Portraits

Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) “Portraitist of the Famous” “Perhaps I should say, flatly, what I believe–that he is a great painter, among the very greatest; but I do know that great art can only be created out of love, and that no greater lover has ever held a brush.” James Baldwin (1924-1987), writer, friend of artist Beauford …
Continue reading Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim Exemplifies Beauford Delaney’s Masterful Portraits

Harlem Renaissance Modernist Beauford Delaney, GREATEST Artist in African-American Art History

“In another religion they honor people who serve like you with Sainthood!”” – Economics Professor Adeel Malik,Oxford University, England and World Renowned News Expert Commentator, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation.

“GOD sent me an ANGEL!”” – Hammer, speaking about Abdul-Jalil.

“Jalil, YOU ARE A TZADIK (SAINT)!”– Barry Barkan, Live Oak Institute and

  Ashoka Fellow at Ashoka Foundation:Innovators for the Public
 

“I thank God for you and for bringing you into my life and for the ministry you have been given to help the people of God!”– Pastor L. J. Jennings, Kingdom Builders Christian Fellowship, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and AMWF

  
Jalil with 1 of his Rolls Royces

Beauford Delaney, Self-portrait, 1944. Photo: Estate of Beauford Delaney by permission of Derek L. Spratley, Esquire, Court Appointed Administrator; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY Beauford Delaney was an American Harlem Renaissance painter known for his colorful Modernist compositions and distinctive approach to figuration. One of the most important African-American artists of the early 20th century, he often painted New York street scenes, lively scenes in jazz clubs, and portraits of prominent black figures like James Baldwin and W.E.B. Du Bois. Can Fire in the Park (1946) is one of his most iconic images, movingly capturing a common occurrence in Depression-era New York life. In addition to his representational work, Delaney also painted abstractly, noting that “the abstraction, ostensibly, is simply for me the penetration of something that is more profound in many ways than the rigidity of a form,” he explained. “A form if it breaths some, if it has some enigma to it, it is also the enigma that is the abstract, I would think.” Born on December 30, 1901 in Knoxville, TN as one of 10 children, he worked as sign-post painter as a teenager before going on to study in Boston at the Massachusetts Normal School, the South Boston School of Art, and the Copley Society. After school, he moved to Harlem in New York, where he befriended fellow artists like
 Alfred Stieglitz 
and
 Stuart Davis 
, who introduced him to the work of Modernists like
 Paul Cézanne 
,
 Pablo Picasso 
,
 Henri Matisse 
, and others. He moved to Europe in 1953 but was unable to find the same success he had previously had in New York, and gradually succumbed to alcoholism and mental health problems before his death on March 26, 1979 in Paris, France. Today, Delaney’s works are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among others. Fame, at least lasting fame — the your-work-goes-down-in-history kind, often accompanied by fat royalty payments — is a club that thinks of itself as an unbiased meritocracy, blind to everything but aesthetic innovation and popular success. It’s never quite worked out that way. When we look at the past, we still see generations of great talents who never quite got their due critically or commercially, many of them left relatively unsung. In this ongoing series, our critics pick artists they feel remain underappreciated and tell their stories and sing their praises. “He is amazing … this Beauford,” the novelist Henry Miller wrote of his lifelong friend Beauford Delaney in a 1945 essay that helped make the painter (whom Miller called a “black monarch” capable of making “the great white world … grow smaller”) a legendary attraction in Greenwich Village. So much so that people often gathered outside Delaney’s building at 181 Greene Street, where he lived and worked on the top floor — a walk-up lit only by a wood-burning potbellied stove. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1901, Delaney migrated north to Boston in 1923 to study art, then moved to New York in November 1929, days after the onset of the Great Depression. That first day in New York, he slept on a Union Square bench, where someone stole his shoes. The next morning, he set out on foot, in newly bought shoes, to walk uptown to Harlem. When he reached Central Park, he stopped because of his severely blistered feet.

Abdul-Jalil Portrait by Beauford Delaney, in 1971. Portrait of Jean Genet in backgroud, top right, Kennedy right behind Jalil
Things had never been tougher for American artists — let alone black ones. Art schools didn’t take black artists, and independent-studio classes banned black artists from figure-drawing sessions with white models. Undaunted, Delaney began drawing at a midtown dance studio. Somehow, his career took off almost overnight. Four months after he arrived in New York, an article appeared in the New York Telegraph about portraits Delaney had done of dancers and society figures.
Beauford Delaney

Artist (1901–79) Currently, MoMA has 
 “Composition 16” 
(1954–56) on view, a glowing bioluminescent yellow abstraction kitty-corner across the gallery from that other (until recently) missing modernist, Hilma af Klint. Both are in the company of de Kooning, Kline, and the other giants of mid-century painting. He met and charmed everyone. A list of his friends and acquaintances includes Stuart Davis — his closest painter compatriot — W.E.B. Du Bois (whose portrait he did), Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Jacob Lawrence, Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe (who did a portrait of him), Edward Steichen, Dorothy Norman, Anaïs Nin (who intimidated him), Jackson Pollock, and Jean Genet. His closest lifelong friend, however, was James Baldwin — who, while fleeing a strict father at 16, looked up Delaney in the Village. He later called the artist his “principal witness.” Delaney was a kind of surrogate nurturing father to the writer. Judging by his 1941 Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), a steamy nude portrait of the 16-year-old writer (as well as from subsequent Baldwin portraits over the decades), Delaney seems to have been in love with the lithe young man 22 years his junior. In October 1938, more than a decade before Pollock graced the same pages, Life magazine featured Delaney, picturing him beatifically smiling at the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit. The caption read, “One of the most talented Negro painters.” Yet by the time he died in 1979, Delaney was alone, alcoholic, hallucinating, paranoid, and penniless in a Paris psychiatric hospital. What started as a great American story is now a near absence in the history of American art and an American Dream forestalled.

A 1941 portrait of James Baldwin by the artist Beauford Delaney. Photo: Beauford Delaney (1901–1979), Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), 1941, oil on Masonite, 34” x 28”, signed; © Estate of Beauford Delaney by permission of Derek L. Spratley, Esquire, Court Appointed Administrator; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY I love his work — especially his highly colored, optically intense, dense figurative paintings. He is almost an exact contemporary of, and the New York counterpart to, another great painter-portraitist, an artist who captured the power and magic of being poor stylishly, who lived on the margins but eventually came to be recognized as a visionary: Alice Neel. Delaney should be regarded as such as well. Through the 1930s and 1940s, while most American artists were either being fifth-rate Cubists, regionalists, or academics or desperately looking for ways around Picasso via Surrealism, Delaney made his own thoroughly contemporary way. In street and park scenes, still lifes, and portraits, he built upon the work of his good friend Davis, arriving at his own compact, flat fields of creamy, opaque color. His sense of visual, jigsawing geometry and strong, graphic distillation of structure is second only to Davis’s. Delaney’s work, however, has a much more human aura, atmosphere, and arc, almost to a mystical degree, seen only in Marsden Hartley. So why has Delaney been disappeared from collective memory? Partly, it is the racial bias of art history, which, among other things, meant that even while he was celebrated, it was less as a painterly equal to his contemporaries than as some kind of Negro seer or spiritual black Buddha. And in 1953, at the age of 51, Delaney left New York at perhaps the worst possible time. When other American artists, like Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, John Cage, and Merce Cunningham, were meeting and staying up late together (many of them open and uncloseted in their sexuality), Delaney was in Paris, where Baldwin had told him he could escape the long American night of racism. Baldwin was right, but Delaney struggled with French and became even more isolated. Twombly, Baldwin, and Miller returned often to New York, while Delaney never did. So he never got to rejoin the conversation. By the 1960s, Delaney’s abstraction was more connected to the French Art Informel — a primarily European response to Abstract Expressionism — and his paintings, influenced as they were by Monet’s Water Lilies and Turner’s glowing color, had few of the ironic, systemic, direct qualities of Pop Art and minimalism. At a distance, Delaney’s work seemed passé — an artist painting in a void, outside the canon. *This article appears in the January 6, 2020, issue of New York Magazine. Beauford Delaney collection, Sc MG 59, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library Repository Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division Access to materials Some collections held by the Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture are held off-site and must be requested in advance. Please check the collection records in
 the NYPL’s online catalog 
for detailed location information. To request access to materials in the Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, please visit:
 http://archives.nypl.org/divisions/scm/request_access 
 Request access to this collection. 

Portrait de Jean Genet, Beauford Delaney, 1972
Beauford Delaney was a painter, specializing in portraits. The Beauford Delaney collection consists of correspondence with colleagues, friends, gallery owners, and family members, as well as printed material documenting Delaney’s life in Paris. BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL INFORMATION Beauford Delaney was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, the third child of the Reverend Samuel Delaney and Delia Johnson Delaney. He attended the Knoxville Colored School and later studied art with an elderly Knoxville artist, who encouraged him to get further training. In 1924 Delaney went to Boston where he studied at the Massachusetts Normal School and the South Boston School of Art, and attended evening classes at the Copley Society. Delaney went to New York in 1929, settling at first in Harlem. He painted society women and professional dancers at Billy Pierce’s dancing school on West 46th Street, which gained him a reputation as a portraitist. His first one-man show, which consisted of five pastels and ten charcoal drawings, was at the 135th Street Branch Library of the New York Public Library in 1930. During the same year three of his portraits were included in a group show at the Whitney Studio Galleries, the predecessor of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Delaney also taught part-time at a progressive school in Greenwich Village. By the late 1940s Beauford Delaney had become a significant figure on the art scene. He illustrated “Unsung Americans Sung” (1944), a book of black musical tributes edited by W.C. Handy; he had a series of one-man shows in New York and Washington, D.C.; and he exhibited in group shows in a number of other cities. In 1945 he showed his first series of portraits of writers Henry Miller and James Baldwin, who would become his lifelong friends. In 1949 he began an association with the Roko Gallery in New York, where he exhibited annually until 1953. In 1953 Delaney left New York with the intention of settling in Rome, but a visit to Paris turned into a permanent stay. He had two studios in Paris, the first in the suburbs of Clamart and the other in the Rue Vincingetorix. In Paris Delaney exhibited in one-man and group shows at the Gallerie Paul Fachetti (1960), the Centre Culturel Americain (1961 and 1972), the Galerie Lambert (1964), the Musee Galliera (1967) and the Galerie Darthea Speyer (1973), among other places. The latter was a major showing of a selection of his work from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s and the catalog contained tributes by James Jones, James Baldwin, and Georgia O’Keefe. Delaney also exhibited in England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the United States. The Paris years saw the creation of several masterpieces including portraits of singer Marian Anderson and writer Jean Genet. During this period he also created a series of interiors and studies in watercolor. After suffering two nervous breakdowns, Delaney was institutionalized, and died on March 26, 1979 at St. Ann’s Hospital in Paris. Delaney’s last one-man show in the United States was at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1978, inaugurating that museum’s Black Masters Series. Delaney’s work is in several private collections and in the collections of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Newark Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. SCOPE AND ARRANGEMENT The Beauford Delaney collection consists of correspondence with colleagues, friends, gallery owners, and family members, as well a printed material documenting Delaney’s life in Paris. Biographical information is provided in statements Delaney authored, articles prepared by others for catalogs, and his obituary. Among the many friends, colleagues and art collectors with whom he maintained an active correspondence is James Baldwin, who wrote an introduction to a catalog for an exhibition of Delaney’s art at Paris’ Galerie Lambert in 1964. Other correspondents include artists Charles Boggs, Al Hirschfeld, John Franklin Koenig, and Ellis Wilson, authors James Jones and Henry Miller (who was also a water colorist), art historian Richard A. Long, and his friend Lynn Stone. Additional artists, painters, writers, gallery owners and musicians who corresponded with Delaney include Lawrence Calcagno, Cab Calloway, Elaine DeKooning, Palmer C. Hayden, and Darthea Speyer. The letters discuss the style of painting of the correspondents, travels, purchase and exhibition of works, and personal matters. Numerous gallery announcements for art exhibits of Delaney’s and other artists’ works in Paris, New York and other cities demonstrate the extent of Delaney’s activities in the contemporary art world. The collection also contains a large number of picture postcards, some sent by friends, and gallery announcements. Family letters are from his brother and fellow artist, Joseph Delaney, and discuss his own work and impressions of Paris; his brother Emery (includes letters Delaney wrote to his brother, in addition to those received); and Delaney’s niece, Imogene.   Beauford Delaney

 Jazz Banb 1963 
 Michael Rosenfeld Gallery 

 All the Races, 1970 
 Michael Rosenfeld Gallery 
Price on Request

 Bernard Hassell, 1961 
 Michael Rosenfeld Gallery 
Price on Request
 Untitled: Abstract in Red, Blue, Yellow and…, 1956 

 Levis Fine Art 
Price on Request Beauford Delaney

 Untitled, 1956 
 Levis Fine Art 
Price on Request

 Mother’s Portrait (aka Portrait of Delia…, 1964 
 Michael Rosenfeld Gallery 
Price on Request Beauford Delaney

 Composition, 1963 
Sale Date: February 6, 2021 Auction Closed

 Self-portrait, 1964 
Sale Date: December 8, 2020 Auction Closed Beauford Delaney 

 Street Scene, 1968 
Sale Date: December 8, 2020 Auction Closed
 SANS TITRE 
Sale Date: July 9, 2020 Auction Closed Beauford Delaney 

 SANS TITRE – 1960, 1960 
Sale Date: July 9, 2020 Auction Closed

 Composition, 1962 
Sale Date: December 13, 2019 Auction Closed SOURCE OF ACQUISITION Donated by Daniel Richard in 1988. PROCESSING INFORMATION Compiled by Victor N. Smythe, 1998. Finding aid edited and adapted to digital form by Kay Menick in 2016. Paintings and art catalogs transferred to Art and Artifact Division. Photographs transferred to Photographs and Prints Division. KEY TERMS NAMES
 Baldwin, James, 1924-1987  (creator)
 Boggs, Charles  (creator)
 Calcagno, Lawrence, 1913-1993  (creator)
 Calloway, Cab, 1907-1994  (creator)
 De Kooning, Elaine  (creator)
 Delaney, Joseph, 1904-1991  (creator)
 Haden, Palmer  (creator)
 Hirschfeld, Al  (creator)
 Jones, James, 1921-1977  (creator)
 Koenig, John Franklin, 1924-1987  (creator)
 Long, Richard A., 1927-2013  (creator)
 Miller, Henry, 1891-1980  (creator)
 Speyer, Dathea  (creator)
 Stone, Lynn M.  (creator)
SUBJECTS
 African American artists 
 African American artists — France — Paris 
 African American painters 
 African American painters — France — Paris 
 Artists — United States 
 Expatriate painters 
 Expatriate painters — France — Paris 
 Painters — France — Paris 
 Painting — United States 
 Painting, American — 20th century — Exhibitions 
As President and CEO of Superstar Management since 1971, the first African-American in this field, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim has a tremendous   wealth of experience in all aspects of business and personal management, contract drafting and negotiations, and performed all arbitrations of salary grievances and contract disputes for all professional sports and entertainment clients with unprecedented legal and historical results. He negotiates and drafts all agreements for all publishing, merchandising and licensing; commercial advertisements and product endorsements; corporate sponsorships and affiliations; motion picture, television, radio and personal appearances. He was the first “SUPER AGENT”, CREATED the Profession of Sports/Music/Entertainment Branding, Marketing and Promoting, the African-American in the field and has taught and lectured Entertainment Law for 35 years. Many of the agents and lawyers in the business where instructed, consulted, influenced or inspired by his work….

Made “Law Review” TWICE with UNPRECEDENTED cases establishing NEW LAW; Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show Founder, Producer and Host, CSA; Expert and Guest Political/Legal/Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Analyst and Commentator; Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Law Lecturor/Presentor; Sports Color Commentator; His “The Stars” show was the FIRST Cable Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show in 1973; OpEd Columnist/Journalist; Sports, Music, Entertainment and Variety Film, TV, Concert and Special Events Content Creator/Producer/Developer/Runner/Promoter; Islamic Dawah Lecturor/Presentor; His Computer Intelligence Company First and Only Minority Certified IBM, Apple, Compact, Microsoft Computer Value Added Dealer (1982); Computer Technology Lecturor/Presentor; MWBE Specialist.

Social Entrepreneurship Merchants Are Merging Ecommerce with Philanthropy

Social Entrepreneurship Merchants Are Merging Ecommerce with Philanthropy

Social entrepreneurship is not a particularly new term, but its use and prestige have grown prodigiously in the last two decades. Combining aspects of standard business models with a backbone of charitable giving and social consciousness, this new form of doing business takes a self-sustaining approach to solving some of the world’s biggest problems.

These merchants are taking on aspects of social entrepreneurship by merging core aspects of their business model with nonprofit and not-for-profit charitable giving.

These merchants large and small are taking on aspects of social entrepreneurship by merging core aspects of their business model with nonprofit and not-for-profit charitable giving. This form of entrepreneurship loops in charitable preservation into its core key performance indicators. The bottom line isn’t just profits, but also the societal and sustainability impact of the project itself.

As if maintaining a pure return on investment month-over-month wasn’t difficult enough, imagine then turning up to 30% of your profits over to fund sustainability and public services. In the rest of this article we’re going to really open up how social entrepreneurship distinguishes itself from other types of charitable actions, ways in which these merchants are giving back to their communities and ways to get involved on the ground level.

Finding the balance between how their business can remain profitable — bringing in constant, sustainable revenue — with aiding a cause as much as possible is a challenging but rewarding practice.

Social entrepreneurship can be broadly defined as businesses that consider profit and societal impact (the net good accomplished) equally. This balance between how their business can remain profitable — bringing in constant, sustainable revenue — with aiding a cause as much as possible is a challenging but rewarding practice. This is how socially conscious businesses will separate themselves from standard nonprofit and not-for-profit operations.

While all of these phrases have more or less the same meaning — and ultimately have the same goals — they operate in their own unique and distinct ways. To silo these terms — for the sheer sake of drawing differences between them — nonprofits can operate with paid staff with a goal of raising surplus funds for their cause.

Surplus funds aren’t redistributed to shareholders, but serve as a happy bonus to move towards future goals. Not-for-profits are generally smaller scale, utilizing volunteer staff. Furthermore, due to their structure, not-for-profits don’t qualify for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status in the same way. Social entrepreneurship is on the right of both of these items, where by developing and creating a sustaining business model, higher profits can be turned into larger expansion and the ability to do more good.

Power in a purchase

With a mission at the core of their business, each social entrepreneur enables the consumer to put buying power behind their purchase. Because the charitable cause is at the center of each transaction, customers have more “buying” power behind their actions. While ecommerce behemoths offer  a paltry 0.5%  (despite record profits), SMBs are leading the charge in socially conscious giving, at times reinvesting 100% of their sales profits to charitable organizations ranging from the  Wounded Warrior Project  to  author associations .

SMBs are leading the charge in socially conscious giving, at times reinvesting 100% of their sales profits to charitable organizations.

By tapping into socially-conscious buying, businesses can leverage the higher expectations consumers are placing onto business. CGS, a business application service provider, found in their 2018 study of retail shoppers that  40% of responders  had an interested in the ethics of a product being produced.

The buy local, shop local approach for groceries and other renewables is going to filter back to online items as well.

This expectation goes further, where roughly that number of users are willing to pay more for sustainable products. However, this should come as no surprise. The buy local, shop local approach for groceries and other renewables is going to filter back to online items as well. If you’re giving your proceeds to charitable causes, or reinvesting in your community, let your potential shoppers know. Include navigation links to your mission statement, or mention in your header that a portion of proceeds go to good causes. It’s a simple value-add to your website, and may ultimately aid in a conversion.

How You Can Get Involved

A clear way to show your involvement in a community is to offer a price-flexible donation product. The process is like  creating any other product , with a necessary product title, description and image, however there are two big differences. The first is that the items weight should be 0 lbs. This is simply so the item does not trigger any of your shipping methods; no customer wants to pay for FedEx Home Delivery for an item that isn’t going to be sent to them. The second aspect is the most important: under the Advanced Info > Misctab you’ll find the checkbox option to “Allow Price Edit”. This feature allows kindhearted customers to edit their item price on the checkout page. Leaving a price of $0.00 on the page keeps the product page blank, or setting a product price can leave a recommend amount.

Once created, you can begin to modify the product with options. Some stores, like the  Ruffed Grouse Society , that allow customers to earmark and dedicate their giving to specific causes within the organization. Other social entrepreneurs, like  Somethin Special , create options featuring  a variety of different charitable organizations  for customers to choose whom their giving benefits.

Building a donation is just one way in which you can put your toe into the veritable social entrepreneurship waters. Standalone products, outreach, social media influence and more, there are so many ways in which you can engage with online communities for a net positive. However, the true benefit of integrating social entrepreneurship tendencies into your business is found outside your brick and mortar. It’s found by following through and aiding the community that needs your helping hand.

Does your business give back to the community? Let us know about what you do in the Contact Us below!

Why Social Entrepreneurship is attracting growing amounts of talent, money, and attention!

What is Social Entrepreneurship?

Social entrepreneurship is attracting growing amounts of talent, money, and attention, but along with its increasing popularity has come less certainty about what exactly a social entrepreneur is and does.

Essentials of Social Innovation

A  starter kit  for leaders of social change.

•  Collective Impact 

•  Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition 

•  The Dawn of System Leadership 

•  Design Thinking for Social Innovation 

•  The Nonprofit Starvation Cycle 

•  Ten Nonprofit Funding Models 

•  The Science of What Makes People Care 

•  Stop Raising Awareness Already 

•  Rediscovering Social Innovation 

•  Innovation Is Not the Holy Grail 

The nascent field of  social entrepreneurship  is growing rapidly and attracting increased attention from many sectors. The term itself shows up frequently in the  media , is referenced by public officials, has become common on university campuses, and informs the strategy of several prominent social sector organizations, including  Ashoka  and the  Schwab  and  Skoll Foundation foundations.

The reasons behind the popularity of social entrepreneurship are many. On the most basic level, there’s something inherently interesting and appealing about entrepreneurs and the stories of why and how they do what they do. People are attracted to social entrepreneurs like last year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus for many of the same reasons that they find  business entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs so compelling – these extraordinary people come up with brilliant ideas and against all the odds succeed at creating new products and services that dramatically improve people’s lives.

But interest in social entrepreneurship transcends the phenomenon of popularity and fascination with people. Social entrepreneurship signals the imperative to drive social change, and it is that potential payoff, with its lasting, transformational benefit to society, that sets the field and its practitioners apart.

Although the potential benefits offered by social entrepreneurship are clear to many of those promoting and funding these activities, the actual definition of what social entrepreneurs do to produce this order of magnitude return is less clear. In fact, we would argue that the definition of social entrepreneurship today is anything but clear. As a result, social entrepreneurship has become so inclusive that it now has an immense tent into which all manner of socially beneficial activities fit.

In some respects this inclusiveness could be a good thing. If plenty of resources are pouring into the social sector, and if many causes that otherwise would not get sufficient funding now get support because they are regarded as social entrepreneurship, then it may be fine to have a loose definition. We are inclined to argue, however, that this is a flawed assumption and a precarious stance.

Social entrepreneurship is an appealing construct precisely because it holds such high promise. If that promise is not fulfilled because too many “nonentrepreneurial” efforts are included in the definition, then social entrepreneurship will fall into disrepute, and the kernel of true social entrepreneurship will be lost. Because of this danger, we believe that we need a much sharper definition of social entrepreneurship, one that enables us to determine the extent to which an activity is and is not “in the tent.” Our goal is not to make an invidious comparison between the contributions made by traditional social service organizations and the results of social entrepreneurship, but simply to highlight what differentiates them.

If we can achieve a rigorous definition, then those who support social entrepreneurship can focus their resources on building and strengthening a concrete and identifiable field. Absent that discipline, proponents of social entrepreneurship run the risk of giving the skeptics an ever-expanding target to shoot at, and the cynics even more reason to discount social innovation and those who drive it.

Starting With Entrepreneurship

Any definition of the term “social entrepreneurship” must start with the word “entrepreneurship.” The word “social” simply modifies entrepreneurship. If entrepreneurship doesn’t have a clear meaning, then modifying it with social won’t accomplish much, either.

The word entrepreneurship is a mixed blessing. On the positive side, it connotes a special, innate ability to sense and act on opportunity, combining out-of-the-box thinking with a unique brand of determination to create or bring about something new to the world. On the negative side, entrepreneurship is an ex post term, because entrepreneurial activities require a passage of time before their true impact is evident.

Interestingly, we don’t call someone who exhibits all of the personal characteristics of an entrepreneur – opportunity sensing, out-of-the-box thinking, and determination – yet who failed miserably in his or her venture an entrepreneur; we call him or her a business failure. Even someone like Bob Young, of Red Hat Software fame, is called a “serial entrepreneur” only after his first success; i.e., all of his prior failures are dubbed the work of a serial entrepreneur only after the occurrence of his first success. The problem with ex post definitions is that they tend to be ill defined. It’s simply harder to get your arms around what’s unproven. An entrepreneur can certainly claim to be one, but without at least one notch on the belt, the self-proclaimed will have a tough time persuading investors to place bets. Those investors, in turn, must be willing to assume greater risk as they assess the credibility of would-be entrepreneurs and the potential impact of formative ventures.

Even with these considerations, we believe that appropriating entrepreneurship for the term social entrepreneurship requires wrestling with what we actually mean by entrepreneurship. Is it simply alertness to opportunity? Creativity? Determination? Although these and other behavioral characteristics are part of the story and certainly provide important clues for prospective investors, they are not the whole story. Such descriptors are also used to describe inventors, artists, corporate executives, and other societal actors.

Like most students of entrepreneurship, we begin with French economist Jean-Baptiste Say, who in the early 19th century described the entrepreneur as one who “shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield,” thereby expanding the literal translation from the French, “one who undertakes,” to encompass the concept of value creation.1

Writing a century later, Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter built upon this basic concept of value creation, contributing what is arguably the most influential idea about entrepreneurship. Schumpeter identified in the entrepreneur the force required to drive economic progress, absent which economies would become static, structurally immobilized, and subject to decay. Enter the Unternehmer, Schumpeter’s entrepreneurial spirit, who identifies a commercial opportunity – whether a material, product, service, or business – and organizes a venture to implement it. Successful entrepreneurship, he argues, sets off a chain reaction, encouraging other entrepreneurs to iterate upon and ultimately propagate the innovation to the point of “creative destruction,” a state at which the new venture and all its related ventures effectively render existing products, services, and business models obsolete.2

Despite casting the dramatis personae in heroic terms, Schumpeter’s analysis grounds entrepreneurship within a system, ascribing to the entrepreneur’s role a paradoxical impact, both disruptive and generative. Schumpeter sees the entrepreneur as an agent of change within the larger economy. Peter Drucker, on the other hand, does not see entrepreneurs as necessarily agents of change themselves, but rather as canny and committed exploiters of change. According to Drucker, “the entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity,”3 a premise picked up by Israel Kirzner, who identifies “alertness” as the entrepreneur’s most critical ability.4

Regardless of whether they cast the entrepreneur as a breakthrough innovator or an early exploiter, theorists universally associate entrepreneurship with opportunity. Entrepreneurs are believed to have an exceptional ability to see and seize upon new opportunities, the commitment and drive required to pursue them, and an unflinching willingness to bear the inherent risks.

Building from this theoretical base, we believe that entrepreneurship describes the combination of a context in which an opportunity is situated, a set of personal characteristics required to identify and pursue this opportunity, and the creation of a particular outcome.

To explore and illustrate our definition of entrepreneurship, we will take a close look at a few contemporary American entrepreneurs (or pairs thereof ): Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak of Apple Computer, Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll of eBay, Ann and Mike Moore of Snugli, and Fred Smith of FedEx.

Entrepreneurial Context

The starting point for entrepreneurship is what we call an entrepreneurial context. For Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, the entrepreneurial context was a computing system in which users were dependent on mainframe computers controlled by a central IT staff who guarded the mainframe like a shrine. Users got their computing tasks done, but only after waiting in line and using the software designed by the IT staff. If users wanted a software program to do something out of the ordinary, they were told to wait six months for the programming to be done.

From the users’ perspective, the experience was inefficient and unsatisfactory. But since the centralized computing model was the only one available, users put up with it and built the delays and inefficiencies into their workflow, resulting in an equilibrium, albeit an unsatisfactory one.

System dynamicists describe this kind of equilibrium as a “balanced feedback loop,” because there isn’t a strong force that has the likely effect of breaking the system out of its particular equilibrium. It is similar to a thermostat on an air conditioner: When the temperature rises, the air conditioner comes on and lowers the temperature, and the thermostat eventually turns the air conditioner off.

The centralized computing system that users had to endure was a particular kind of equilibrium: an unsatisfactory one. It is as if the thermostat were set five degrees too low so that everyone in the room was cold. Knowing they have a stable and predictable temperature, people simply wear extra sweaters, though of course they might wish that they didn’t have to.

Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll identified an unsatisfactory equilibrium in the inability of geographically based markets to optimize the interests of both buyers and sellers. Sellers typically didn’t know who the best buyer was and buyers typically didn’t know who the best (or any) seller was. As a result, the market was not optimal for buyers or sellers. People selling used household goods, for example, held garage sales that attracted physically proximate buyers, but probably not the optimal number or types of buyers. People trying to buy obscure goods had no recourse but to search through Yellow Page directories, phoning and phoning to try to track down what they really wanted, often settling for something less than perfect. Because buyers and sellers couldn’t conceive of a better answer, the stable, yet suboptimal, equilibrium prevailed.

Ann and Mike Moore took note of a subpar equilibrium in parents’ limited options for toting their infants. Parents wishing to keep their babies close while carrying on basic tasks had two options: They could learn to juggle offspring in one arm while managing chores with the other, or they could plop the child in a stroller, buggy, or other container and keep the child nearby. Either option was less than ideal. Everyone knows that newborns benefit from the bonding that takes place because of close physical contact with their mothers and fathers, but even the most attentive and devoted parents can’t hold their babies continuously. With no other options, parents limped along, learning to shift their child from one hip to the other and becoming adept at “one-armed paper hanging,” or attempting to get their tasks accomplished during naptime.

In the case of Fred Smith, the suboptimal equilibrium he saw was the long-distance courier service. Before FedEx came along, sending a package across country was anything but simple. Local courier services picked up the package and transported it to a common carrier, who flew the package to the remote destination city, at which point it was handed over to a third party for final delivery (or perhaps back to the local courier’s operation in that city if it was a national company). This system was logistically complex, it involved a number of handoffs, and the scheduling was dictated by the needs of the common carriers. Often something would go wrong, but no one would take responsibility for solving the problem. Users learned to live with a slow, unreliable, and unsatisfactory service – an unpleasant but stable situation because no user could change it.

Entrepreneurial Characteristics

The entrepreneur is attracted to this suboptimal equilibrium, seeing embedded in it an opportunity to provide a new solution, product, service, or process. The reason that the entrepreneur sees this condition as an opportunity to create something new, while so many others see it as an inconvenience to be tolerated, stems from the unique set of personal characteristics he or she brings to the situation – inspiration, creativity, direct action, courage, and fortitude. These characteristics are fundamental to the process of innovation.

The entrepreneur is inspired to alter the unpleasant equilibrium. Entrepreneurs might be motivated to do this because they are frustrated users or because they empathize with frustrated users. Sometimes entrepreneurs are so gripped by the opportunity to change things that they possess a burning desire to demolish the status quo. In the case of eBay, the frustrated user was Omidyar’s girlfriend, who collected Pez dispensers.

The entrepreneur thinks creatively and develops a new solution that dramatically breaks with the existing one. The entrepreneur doesn’t try to optimize the current system with minor adjustments, but instead finds a wholly new way of approaching the problem. Omidyar and Skoll didn’t develop a better way to promote garage sales. Jobs and Wozniak didn’t develop algorithms to speed custom software development. And Smith didn’t invent a way to make the handoffs between courier companies and common carriers more efficient and error-free. Each found a completely new and utterly creative solution to the problem at hand.

Once inspired by the opportunity and in possession of a creative solution, the entrepreneur takes direct action. Rather than waiting for someone else to intervene or trying to convince somebody else to solve the problem, the entrepreneur takes direct action by creating a new product or service and the venture to advance it. Jobs and Wozniak didn’t campaign against mainframes or encourage users to rise up and overthrow the IT department; they invented a personal computer that allowed users to free themselves from the mainframe. Moore didn’t publish a book telling mothers how to get more done in less time; she developed the Snugli, a frameless front- or backpack that enables parents to carry their babies and still have both hands free. Of course, entrepreneurs do have to influence others: first investors, even if just friends and family; then teammates and employees, to come work with them; and finally customers, to buy into their ideas and their innovations. The point is to differentiate the entrepreneur’s engagement in direct action from other indirect and supportive actions.

Entrepreneurs demonstrate courage throughout the process of innovation, bearing the burden of risk and staring failure squarely if not repeatedly in the face. This often requires entrepreneurs to take big risks and do things that others think are unwise, or even undoable. For example, Smith had to convince himself and the world that it made sense to acquire a fleet of jets and build a gigantic airport and sorting center in Memphis, in order to provide next-day delivery without the package ever leaving FedEx’s possession. He did this at a time when all of his entrenched competitors had only fleets of trucks for local pickup and delivery – they certainly didn’t run airports and maintain huge numbers of aircraft.

Finally, entrepreneurs possess the fortitude to drive their creative solutions through to fruition and market adoption. No entrepreneurial venture proceeds without setbacks or unexpected turns, and the entrepreneur needs to be able to find creative ways around the barriers and challenges that arise. Smith had to figure out how to keep investors confident that FedEx would eventually achieve the requisite scale to pay for the huge fixed infrastructure of trucks, planes, airport, and IT systems required for the new model he was creating. FedEx had to survive hundreds of millions of dollars of losses before it reached a cash-flow positive state, and without a committed entrepreneur at the helm, the company would have been liquidated well before that point.

Entrepreneurial Outcome

What happens when an entrepreneur successfully brings his or her personal characteristics to bear on a suboptimal equilibrium? He or she creates a new stable equilibrium, one that provides a meaningfully higher level of satisfaction for the participants in the system. To elaborate on Say’s original insight, the entrepreneur engineers a permanent shift from a lower-quality equilibrium to a higher-quality one. The new equilibrium is permanent because it first survives and then stabilizes, even though some aspects of the original equilibrium may persist (e.g., expensive and less-efficient courier systems, garage sales, and the like). Its survival and success ultimately move beyond the entrepreneur and the original entrepreneurial venture. It is through mass-market adoption, significant levels of imitation, and the creation of an ecosystem around and within the new equilibrium that it first stabilizes and then securely persists.

When Jobs and Wozniak created the personal computer they didn’t simply attenuate the users’ dependence on the mainframe – they shattered it, shifting control from the “glass house” to the desktop. Once the users saw the new equilibrium appearing before their eyes, they embraced not only Apple but also the many competitors who leaped into the fray. In relatively short order, the founders had created an entire ecosystem with numerous hardware, software, and peripheral suppliers; distribution channels and value-added resellers; PC magazines; trade shows; and so on.

Because of this new ecosystem, Apple could have exited from the market within a few years without destabilizing it. The new equilibrium, in other words, did not depend on the creation of a single venture, in this case Apple, but on the appropriation and replication of the model and the spawning of a host of other related businesses. In Schumpeterian terms, the combined effect firmly established a new computing order and rendered the old mainframe-based system obsolete.

In the case of Omidyar and Skoll, the creation of eBay provided a superior way for buyers and sellers to connect, creating a higher equilibrium. Entire new ways of doing business and new businesses sprang up to create a powerful ecosystem that simply couldn’t be disassembled. Similarly, Smith created a new world of package delivery that raised standards, changed business practices, spawned new competitors, and even created a new verb: “to FedEx.”

In each case, the delta between the quality of the old equilibrium and the new one was huge. The new equilibrium quickly became self-sustaining, and the initial entrepreneurial venture spawned numerous imitators. Together these outcomes ensured that everyone who benefited secured the higher ground.

Shift to Social Entrepreneurship

If these are the key components of entrepreneurship, what distinguishes social entrepreneurship from its for-profit cousin? First, we believe that the most useful and informative way to define social entrepreneurship is to establish its congruence with entrepreneurship, seeing social entrepreneurship as grounded in these same three elements. Anything else is confusing and unhelpful.

To understand what differentiates the two sets of entrepreneurs from one another, it is important to dispel the notion that the difference can be ascribed simply to motivation – with entrepreneurs spurred on by money and social entrepreneurs driven by altruism. The truth is that entrepreneurs are rarely motivated by the prospect of financial gain, because the odds of making lots of money are clearly stacked against them. Instead, both the entrepreneur and the social entrepreneur are strongly motivated by the opportunity they identify, pursuing that vision relentlessly, and deriving considerable psychic reward from the process of realizing their ideas. Regardless of whether they operate within a market or a not-for-profit context, most entrepreneurs are never fully compensated for the time, risk, effort, and capital that they pour into their venture.

We believe that the critical distinction between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship lies in the value proposition itself. For the entrepreneur, the value proposition anticipates and is organized to serve markets that can comfortably afford the new product or service, and is thus designed to create financial profit. From the outset, the expectation is that the entrepreneur and his or her investors will derive some personal financial gain. Profit is sine qua non, essential to any venture’s  sustainability and the means to its ultimate end in the form of large-scale market adoption and ultimately a new equilibrium.

The social entrepreneur, however, neither anticipates nor organizes to create substantial financial profit for his or her investors – philanthropic and  government organizations  for the most part – or for himself or herself. Instead, the social entrepreneur aims for value in the form of large-scale, transformational benefit that accrues either to a significant segment of society or to society at large. Unlike the entrepreneurial value proposition that assumes a market that can pay for the innovation, and may even provide substantial upside for investors, the social entrepreneur’s value proposition targets an underserved, neglected, or highly disadvantaged population that lacks the financial means or political clout to achieve the transformative benefit on its own. This does not mean that social entrepreneurs as a hard-and-fast rule shun profitmaking value propositions. Ventures created by social entrepreneurs can certainly generate income, and they can be organized as either not-for- profits or for-profits. What distinguishes social entrepreneurship is the primacy of social benefit, what Duke University professor Greg Dees in his seminal work on the field characterizes as the pursuit of “mission-related impact.”5

We define social entrepreneurship as having the following three components: (1) identifying a stable but inherently unjust equilibrium that causes the exclusion, marginalization, or suffering of a segment of humanity that lacks the financial means or political clout to achieve any transformative benefit on its own; (2) identifying an opportunity in this unjust equilibrium, developing a social value proposition, and bringing to bear inspiration, creativity, direct action, courage, and fortitude, thereby challenging the stable state’s hegemony; and (3) forging a new, stable equilibrium that releases trapped potential or alleviates the suffering of the targeted group, and through imitation and the creation of a stable ecosystem around the new equilibrium ensuring a better future for the targeted group and even society at large.

Muhammad Yunus, founder of the  Grameen Bank  and father of microcredit, provides a classic example of social entrepreneurship. The stable but unfortunate equilibrium he identified consisted of poor Bangladeshis’ limited options for securing even the tiniest amounts of credit. Unable to qualify for loans through the formal banking system, they could borrow only by accepting exorbitant interest rates from local moneylenders. More commonly, they simply succumbed to begging on the streets. Here was a stable equilibrium of the most unfortunate sort, one that perpetuated and even exacerbated Bangladesh’s endemic  poverty  and the misery arising from it.

Yunus confronted the system, proving that the poor were extremely good credit risks by lending the now famous sum of $27 from his own pocket to 42 women from the village of Jobra. The women repaid all of the loan. Yunus found that with even tiny amounts of capital, women invested in their own capacity for generating income. With a sewing machine, for example, women could tailor garments, earning enough to pay back the loan, buy food, educate their children, and lift themselves up from poverty. Grameen Bank sustained itself by charging interest on its loans and then recycling the capital to help other women. Yunus brought inspiration, creativity, direct action, courage, and fortitude to his venture, proved its viability, and over two decades spawned a global network of other organizations that replicated or adapted his model to other countries and cultures, firmly establishing microcredit as a worldwide industry.

The well-known actor, director, and producer Robert Redford offers a less familiar but also illustrative case of social entrepreneurship. In the early 1980s, Redford stepped back from his successful career to reclaim space in the film industry for artists. Redford was struck by a set of opposing forces in play. He identified an inherently oppressive but stable equilibrium in the way Hollywood worked, with its business model increasingly driven by financial interests, its productions gravitating to flashy, frequently violent blockbusters, and its studio-dominated system becoming more and more centralized in controlling the way films were financed, produced, and distributed. At the same time, he noted that new technology was emerging – less cumbersome and less expensive video and digital editing equipment – that gave filmmakers the tools they needed to exert more control over their work.

Seeing opportunity, Redford seized the chance to nurture this new breed of artist. First, he created the Sundance Institute to take “money out of the picture” and provide young filmmakers with space and support for developing their ideas. Next, he created the Sundance Film Festival to showcase independent filmmakers’ work. From the beginning, Redford’s value proposition focused on the emerging independent filmmaker whose talents were neither recognized nor served by the market stranglehold of the Hollywood studio system.

Redford structured Sundance Institute as a  nonprofit  corporation, tapping his network of directors, actors, writers, and others to contribute their experience as volunteer mentors to fledgling filmmakers. He priced the Sundance Film Festival so that it appealed and was accessible to a broad audience. Twenty-five years later, Sundance is credited with ushering in the independent film movement, which today ensures that “indie” filmmakers can get their work produced and distributed, and that filmgoers have access to a whole host of options – from thought-provoking documentaries to edgy international work and playful animations. A new equilibrium, which even a decade ago felt tenuous, is now firmly established.

Victoria Hale is an example of a social entrepreneur whose venture is still in its early stages and for whom our criteria apply ex ante. Hale is a pharmaceutical scientist who became increasingly frustrated by the market forces dominating her industry. Although big pharmaceutical companies held patents for drugs capable of curing any number of infectious diseases, the drugs went undeveloped for a simple reason: The populations most in need of the drugs were unable to afford them. Driven by the exigency of generating financial profits for its shareholders, the pharmaceutical industry was focusing on creating and  marketing  drugs for diseases afflicting the well-off, living mostly in developed world markets, who could pay for them.

Hale became determined to challenge this stable equilibrium, which she saw as unjust and intolerable. She created the Institute for  OneWorld Health , the first nonprofit pharmaceutical company whose mission is to ensure that drugs targeting infectious diseases in the developing world get to the people who need them, regardless of their ability to pay for the drugs. Hale’s venture has now moved beyond the proof-of-concept stage. It successfully developed, tested, and secured Indian government regulatory approval for its first drug, paromomycin, which provides a cost-effective cure for visceral leishmaniasis, a disease that kills more than 200,000 people each year.

Although it is too early to tell whether Hale will succeed in creating a new equilibrium that assures more equitable treatment of diseases afflicting the poor, she clearly meets the criteria of a social entrepreneur. First, Hale has identified a stable but unjust equilibrium in the pharmaceutical industry; second, she has seen and seized the opportunity to intervene, applying inspiration, creativity, direct action, and courage in launching a new venture to provide options for a disadvantaged population; and third, she is demonstrating fortitude in proving the potential of her model with an early success.

Time will tell whether Hale’s innovation inspires others to replicate her efforts, or whether the Institute for OneWorld Health itself achieves the scale necessary to bring about that permanent equilibrium shift. But the signs are promising. Looking ahead a decade or more, her investors – the Skoll Foundation is one – can imagine the day when Hale’s Institute for OneWorld Health will have created a new pharmaceutical paradigm, one with the same enduring social benefits apparent in the now firmly established microcredit and independent film industries.

Boundaries of Social Entrepreneurship

In defining social entrepreneurship, it is also important to establish boundaries and provide examples of activities that may be highly meritorious but do not fit our definition. Failing to identify boundaries would leave the term social entrepreneurship so wide open as to be essentially meaningless.

There are two primary forms of socially valuable activity that we believe need to be distinguished from social entrepreneurship. The first type of social venture is social service provision. In this case, a courageous and committed individual identifies an unfortunate stable equilibrium – AIDS orphans in Africa, for example – and sets up a program to address it – for example, a school for the children to ensure that they are cared for and educated. The new school would certainly help the children it serves and may very well enable some of them to break free from poverty and transform their lives. But unless it is designed to achieve large scale or is so compelling as to launch legions of imitators and replicators, it is not likely to lead to a new superior equilibrium.

These types of social service ventures never break out of their limited frame: Their impact remains constrained, their service area stays confined to a local population, and their scope is determined by whatever resources they are able to attract. These ventures are inherently vulnerable, which may mean disruption or loss of service to the populations they serve. Millions of such organizations exist around the world – well intended, noble in purpose, and frequently exemplary in execution – but they should not be confused with social entrepreneurship.

It would be possible to reformulate a school for AIDS orphans as social entrepreneurship. But that would require a plan by which the school itself would spawn an entire network of schools and secure the basis for its ongoing support. The outcome would be a stable new equilibrium whereby even if one school closed, there would be a robust system in place through which AIDS orphans would routinely receive an education.

The difference between the two types of ventures – one social entrepreneurship and the other social service – isn’t in the initial entrepreneurial contexts or in many of the personal characteristics of the founders, but rather in the outcomes. Imagine that Andrew Carnegie had built only one library rather than conceiving the public library system that today serves untold millions of American citizens. Carnegie’s single library would have clearly benefited the community it served. But it was his vision of an entire system of libraries creating a permanent new equilibrium – one ensuring access to information and knowledge for all the nation’s citizens – that anchors his reputation as a social entrepreneur.

A second class of social venture is social  activism . In this case, the motivator of the activity is the same – an unfortunate and stable equilibrium. And several aspects of the actor’s characteristics are the same – inspiration, creativity, courage, and fortitude. What is different is the nature of the actor’s action orientation. Instead of taking direct action, as the social entrepreneur would, the social activist attempts to create change through indirect action, by influencing others – governments, NGOs, consumers, workers, etc. – to take action. Social activists may or may not create ventures or organizations to advance the changes they seek. Successful activism can yield substantial improvements to existing systems and even result in a new equilibrium, but the strategic nature of the action is distinct in its emphasis on influence rather than on direct action.

Why not call these people social entrepreneurs? It wouldn’t be a tragedy. But such people have long had a name and an exalted tradition: the tradition of Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi, and Vaclav Havel. They are social activists. Calling them something entirely new – i.e., social entrepreneurs – and thereby confusing the general public, who already know what a social activist is, would not be helpful to the cause of either social activists or social entrepreneurs.

Shades of Gray

Having created a definition of social entrepreneurship and distinguished it from social service provision and social activism, we should recognize that in practice, many social actors incorporate strategies associated with these pure forms or create  hybrid  models. The three definitions can be seen in their pure forms in the diagram to the right.

In the pure form, the successful social entrepreneur takes direct action and generates a new and sustained equilibrium; the social activist influences others to generate a new and sustained equilibrium; and the social service provider takes direct action to improve the outcomes of the current equilibrium.

It is important to distinguish between these types of social ventures in their pure forms, but in the real world there are probably more hybrid models than pure forms. It is arguable that Yunus, for example, used social activism to accelerate and amplify the impact of Grameen Bank, a classic example of social entrepreneurship. By using a sequential hybrid – social entrepreneurship followed by social activism – Yunus turned microcredit into a global force for change.

Other organizations are hybrids using both social entrepreneurship and social activism at the same time. Standards-setting or certification organizations are an example of this. Although the actions of the standards-setting organization itself do not create societal change – those who are encouraged or forced to abide by the standards take the actions that produce the actual societal change – the organization can demonstrate social entrepreneurship in creating a compelling approach to standards-setting and in marketing the standards to regulators and market participants. Fair-trade product certification and marketing is a familiar example of this, with organizations like Cafédirect in the United Kingdom and TransFair USA in the U.S. creating growing niche markets for coffee and other commodities sold at a premium price that guarantees more equitable remuneration for small-scale producers.

Kailash Satyarthi’s  RugMark  campaign provides a particularly striking example of a hybrid model. Recognizing the inherent limitations of his work to rescue children enslaved in India’s rug-weaving trade, Satyarthi set his sights on the carpet- weaving industry. By creating the RugMark certification program and a public relations campaign designed to educate consumers who unwittingly perpetuate an unjust equilibrium, Satyarthi leveraged his effectiveness as a service provider by embracing the indirect strategy of the activist. Purchasing a carpet that has the RugMark label assures buyers that their carpet has been created without child slavery and under fair labor conditions. Educate enough of those prospective buyers, he reasoned, and one has a shot at transforming the entire carpet-weaving industry.

Satyarthi’s action in creating RugMark lies at the crossroads of entrepreneurship and activism: In itself, the RugMark label represented a creative solution and required direct action, but it is a device meant to educate and influence others, with the ultimate goal of establishing and securing a new and far more satisfactory market-production equilibrium.

Social service provision combined with social activism at a more tactical level can also produce an outcome equivalent to that of social entrepreneurship. Take, for example, a social service provider running a single school for an underprivileged group that creates great outcomes for that small group of students. If the organization uses those outcomes to create a social activist movement that campaigns for broad government support for the wide adoption of similar programs, then the social service provider can produce an overall equilibrium change and have the same effect as a social entrepreneur.

 Bill Strickland’s Manchester Bidwell Corporation , a nationally renowned inner-city arts education and job-training program, has launched the National Center for Arts & Technology to advance systematically the replication of his Pittsburgh-based model in other cities. Strickland is spearheading an  advocacy  campaign designed to leverage federal support to scale up his model. So far, four new centers are operating across the U.S. and several more are in the pipeline. With a sustainable system of centers in cities across the country, Strickland will have succeeded in establishing a new equilibrium. It is because of that campaign that the Skoll Foundation and others are investing in Strickland’s efforts.

Why bother to tease out these distinctions between various pure and hybrid models? Because with such definitions in hand we are all better equipped to assess distinctive types of social activity. Understanding the means by which an endeavor produces its social benefit and the nature of the social benefit it is targeting enables supporters – among whom we count the Skoll Foundation – to predict the sustainability and extent of those benefits, to anticipate how an organization may need to adapt over time, and to make a more reasoned projection of the potential for an entrepreneurial outcome.

Why Should We Care?

Long shunned by economists, whose interests have gravitated toward market-based, price-driven models that submit more readily to data-driven interpretation, entrepreneurship has experienced something of a renaissance of interest in recent years. Building on the foundation laid by Schumpeter, William Baumol and a handful of other scholars have sought to restore the entrepreneur’s rightful place in “production and distribution” theory, demonstrating in that process the seminal role of entrepreneurship.6 According to Carl Schramm, CEO of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, entrepreneurs, “despite being overlooked or explicitly written out of our economic drama,”7 are the free enterprise system’s essential ingredient and absolutely indispensable to market economies.

We are concerned that serious thinkers will also overlook social entrepreneurship, and we fear that the indiscriminate use of the term may undermine its significance and potential importance to those seeking to understand how societies change and progress. Social entrepreneurship, we believe, is as vital to the progress of societies as is entrepreneurship to the progress of economies, and it merits more rigorous, serious attention than it has attracted so far.

Clearly, there is much to be learned and understood about social entrepreneurship, including why its study may not be taken seriously. Our view is that a clearer definition of social entrepreneurship will aid the development of the field. The social entrepreneur should be understood as someone who targets an unfortunate but stable equilibrium that causes the neglect, marginalization, or suffering of a segment of humanity; who brings to bear on this situation his or her inspiration, direct action, creativity, courage, and fortitude; and who aims for and ultimately affects the establishment of a new stable equilibrium that secures permanent benefit for the targeted group and society at large.

This definition helps distinguish social entrepreneurship from social service provision and social activism. That social service providers, social activists, and social entrepreneurs will often adapt one another’s strategies and develop hybrid models is, to our minds, less inherently confusing and more respectful than indiscriminate use of these terms. It’s our hope that our categorization will help clarify the distinctive value each approach brings to society and lead ultimately to a better understanding and more informed decision making among those committed to advancing positive social change.

The authors would like to thank their Skoll Foundation colleagues Richard Fahey, chief operating officer, and Ruth Norris, senior program officer, who read prior drafts of this essay and contributed important ideas to its evolution.

 
 
Notes

1 Jean-Baptiste Say, quoted in J. Gregory Dees, “ The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship ,’” reformatted and revised, May 30, 2001.
2 Joseph A. Schumpeter, Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy (New York: Harper, 1975): 82-85.
3 Peter F. Drucker, Innovation & Entrepreneurship (New York: Harper Business, 1995): 28.
4 Israel Kirzner, quoted in William J. Baumol, “ Return of the Invisible Men: The Microeconomic Value Theory of Inventors and Entrepreneurs .”
5 Dees, 2.
6 Baumol, 1.
7 Carl J. Schramm, “ Entrepreneurial Capitalism and the End of Bureaucracy: Reforming the Mutual Dialog of Risk Aversion ,”  2.

What Muhammad Ali’s Funeral, Janaaza, Will Teach Us About Islam

What Muhammad Ali’s Funeral, Janaaza, Will Teach Us About Islam
When “The GREATEST of All Time, The Peoples Champ”, Allah Ali Hajjirahmemek me Muhammad Ali, is buried, millions of Americans will have their first glimpse of the Islamic funeral service, Janaaza—one that looks a lot like Jewish and Christian services. Thursday, the world saw the most widely covered Muslim funeral in our nation’s history.
No one would’ve been happier about this than Muhammad Ali. May Allah (SWT) grant him Jannat-ul-Firdous.
Ali wanted to be an ambassador for Islam in America, as he told us in his 2005 book The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life’s Journey, co-authored with his daughter Hana. In it, he shared an unfulfilled dream he had harbored, “I sometimes thought I would like to be a Muslim Billy Graham.” He continued: “But God had a different plan for me.”
SportsImage Ali CoverOn November 5, 1995, we brought Ali here to California to honor him with “The Sports Image Award”, as one in sports that had given the most dedicated effort, time and money to better their community, the nation and the world. Those who out matched their dignity with dollars and who use sports for it’s highest and most noble purpose, the uplifting of the human family!
That “plan,” of course, was Parkinson’s disease. It was only through his Muslim faith, Ali continued, that he “could deal with this challenge… it was my faith that restored my sense of purpose and self-confidence. My faith gave me back my joy and enthusiasm for life.”
It’s hard to reading that for a man whom was called simply “The Greatest” and had achieved so much knew that Parkinson’s made the beautiful dream he had for the next phase of his life impossible, or an unplanned reality.
And to cry tears of regret that if Ali could have fulfilled his dream of being a bridge between Muslims and our fellow Americans, perhaps our community wouldn’t be in the place we find ourselves in today.
That’s a dark, challenging and often lonely place. One where politicians like Donald Trump demonize us to score political points. A place where hate crimes against us have spiked over the past year. Where Muslim American students being bullied for their faith is no longer the exception, but the disturbing new norm.
On a personal note, I can’t help but think of the traditional white cloth the body was wrapped in after the ceremonial washing of his body—just as Ali was before his funeral Thursday, when many Americans will have a new experience and even learn a new word: Janaaza. That’s the Arabic word for funeral, and one Christian Arabs also use.
For Muslims, however, Janaaza signifies the Islamic funeral ritual. At Thursday’s Janaaza for Ali, Zaid Shakir will offer a traditional prayer that asks God for “mercy, forgiveness of Ali’s sins and acceptance of Ali into heaven.”
Islamic funeral prayer is very much like the ones offered at Christian and Jewish funerals of seeking mercy, forgiveness and acceptance into heaven. We may use different words or even languages but all three of these Abrahamic faiths share the same common humanity and God.
As for the burying of Ali, typically in Islam, like Judaism, the deceased should be buried as soon as possible. But it’s not an absolute mandate, rather “it’s more about appropriateness.” In Ali’s case, it was appropriate to wait so that the family could organize the funeral and memorial service so that the world could pay their respects to one of its icons—a man who was proudly Muslim, proudly Black and proudly American.
Ali’s prayer service, at the Freedom Hall in Louisville Kentucky, was open to people of all faiths. It will be followed Friday by an interfaith memorial service for the greatest. As the spokesperson for the Ali family explained earlier this week, “Ali spoke of inclusiveness his entire life and we want this to be inclusive of everyone.”
Honoring AliThis significance of Ali’s public funeral has certainly not been lost on Muslim Americans. As Ali’s “detailed wishes for his funeral prayer and memorial were that they be open to all people and all faiths, a powerful testimony to the inclusive principles he lived by” as a Muslim and an American.
In a political climate in which Islamophobia is front and center, his funeral will counterpunch the ridiculous notion that being a good Muslim and a good American are at odds.”
When a person dies, Muslims traditionally say, “To God we belong and to God we shall return.” Ali may have returned to God, but on Thursday and Friday Ali will bring together Muslims from across the nation to stand shoulder to shoulder with their fellow Americans of different religions and races. Even after his death, Ali is still fighting for the things he so dearly believed in.
R.I.P. dear Friend, role model, and client!,
Jalil

AMWF & Oakland Public Library Host FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY

AMWF & Oakland Public Library Host FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY
Swap Not Shop
Why shop when you can swap?
The AARON & MARGARET WALLACE FOUNDATION (AMWF), will be partnering with the Oakland Public Library to host a FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY on Friday, April 8, 2016, ALL DAY at the Eastmont Branch Library, Eastmont Mall- 7200 Bancroft St., Ste. 211, Oakland California. Everything is FREE OF CHARGE!! Just select a few items you need of the items donated.
Hand of Dignity” Program
AMWF provides a wide range of educational opportunities and employment preparation services for our clients including scholarship and admissions programs, referrals for job training, career development support, resume workshops, job search assistance, interview skills training and preparation.
AMWF, a volunteer-based organization, extends the “Hand of Dignity” to those less fortunate- men, women, and children, and provides them with the basic human necessity of quality, proper clothing, shoes, and accessories with an emphasis on low-income residents successfully obtaining an education or seeking employment to successfully transitioning into the workforce.
Our goal in the “Hand of Dignity” Program is to help low-income residents in Bay Area Counties improve their self-image and self-esteem by providing them with quality school or business apparel appropriate for attending school, job interviews and the professional workplace so they can obtain and education, secure employment and become economically self-sufficient. Many of the women in need of these services have nothing but the clothes on their back because they are escaping from abusive situations.
“Hand of Dignity” accepts new and gently used baby, children, teen youth, men’s and women’s clothing in excellent condition. We do not accept items in bad condition and they must not be noticeably worn, stained, torn, or imperfect. We are very selective as to what we will accept and ask/require that all donations to be in excellent condition, cleaned, pressed and on hangers.
We refresh the baby, children, teen youth clothing and give them new life with someone in need.
“Hand of Dignity” rescue, restore, and re-purpose the men’s and women’s business attire and accessories (suits, shirts, blouses, dresses, skirts, ties, scarfs, shoes, accessories, etc.) and provide them to individuals and programs which support people in transition or on welfare get jobs in the business world. Those “Qualified” clients in need can call to arrange a fitting of business attire and visit our ”showroom”, meet with a volunteer wardrobe adviser who helps select appropriate outfits for interviews and work for their new job.
Are there any clothes in your closet that you no longer wear? Put them to use by donating them to AMWF. The less fortunate are always in need of stylish, fresh, clean clothes. We would like to encourage you all to take the opportunity to do a little “closet purging” — and gather all those things that, quite honestly, will NEVER fit your body again.
Among the things that will find a new home with someone in need are some of your very nice, “classic” style, men’s and women’s suits, shirts, blouses, dresses, skirts, ties, scarfs, shoes, accessories, children and babies clothing, etc.
AMWF specializes in some new, but mostly gently used clothing and accessories in designer apparel sold in the nation’s leading upscale department stores and retailers and provide First Quality designer apparel, footwear, and accessories. We operate and maintain an inventory so we can offer our patrons diverse selection at all times. This is what separates us from the majority of non-profit distributors. We also handle electronics, sporting goods, toiletries, general merchandise, and more. We offer great styles in urban wear clothing, hip hop and designer apparel names like Armani, Ralph Lauren Corporation, Hugo Boss, Lacoste, Calvin Klein, Gucci, Burberry, Nike, Adidas, Tommy Hilfiger, Diesel, J. Crew, American Eagle, Abercrombie & Fitch, Puma, Lee,Dolce & Gabbana, Christian Dior, Versace, Banana Republic, Timberland, Vans, Gap, Reebok, New Balance, Zara, Levi Strauss, DKNY, Quicksilver, Kenneth Cole, Hollister, H&M, Izod, Clarks, Perry Ellis, Superdry, Champion, Michael Kors, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Givenchy, Aeropostale, Under Armour, Lululemon, Chanel, Forever 21, Ralph Lauren,Van’s, Converse, Macy’s, Nordstrom, Jordan, Target, Lilly Pulitzer, Eileen Fisher, Tory Burch, Justice, Diesel, True Religion, Ed Hardy, Haggar, Apple, Urban Outfitters, Ray Ban, Old Navy, Wet Seal, Quiksilver, Hurley, Billabong, Penguin, BCBG, Ann Taylor, Arizona, Baby Phat, Bebe, Billabong, Buffalo, Express, Expressions, Girbaud, Guess, Gymboree, Healthtex, Heritage, Hurley, John Deere, Lands End, Le Tigre, League, Lucky Brand, Mossimo, Next Concept, NY & Co., Choppers, Penguin, Munsingwear, Private Label, Rampage, Redsand, Roxy, Sean John, Timberland, Tommy Bahama, True People, Turbulance, U.S. Expedition, US Polo Association, Victoria Secret, Von Dutch, William Rast, Ecko, Eddie Bauer, Akademiks, Energie, Fila, Fubu, Gap, North Face, Phat Farm, Rocawear, Avirex, Ocean Pacific, Hanes, Jerzees, Gildan, Sport-Tek, Dockers, Ecko, Eddie Bauer, Enyce, Esprit, Faded Glory, Harley Davidson, Nautica, Umbro, Varcity VeeTee, Vokal, Zoo York, Clarks, Alfani, Disney, Hello Kitty, Sesame Street, Gymboree, Jockey, Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, Bike, Bali, Chantelle, Glamorise, Olga, Playtex, Spanx, Wacoal, K-Swiss, Asics, Saucony, Brooks, Mizuno, New Socks, Altamont, American Needle, Beats by Dre, Been Trill, Black Scale, Brixton, Crooks & Castles, DGK, Dickies, Funderwear, Hall of Fame, ICNY, LRG, Maui & Sons, Mishka, Neff, New Balance, O’Neill, Oakley, Pacsun, Rainbow, Ray-Ban, Reef, Riot Society, Vanguard, Volcom, Young & Reckless, Beauty & the Beach, Body Glove, Brixton, Bullhead Denim Co., Diamond Supply Co., Dolce Vita, Erin Wasson, Glamorous, Insight, JanSport, Kirra, Pink, Body-Solid, Fitness Gear, Valor Fitness, Rage, Easton, Everlast, FootJoy, Franklin, JanSport, Jockey, Ecco, E-Force, Ektelon, Marmot, Maui Jim, Maxfli, McDavid, Oakley, O’Brien, Ocean Minded, O’Neill, Rawlings, Riddell, Spalding, Speedo, Wilson, Wolverine, Worth, and others!
Apparel donations can be dropped off in the Bay Area or a convenient and easy pick-up can be arranged. For complete information, call or text us at 510 394-4101.
Please click the link and complete the “Hand of Dignity” request form to instruct us how best to help you.
We are looking for a shop in the East Bay Area, California, to offer FREE clothing and accessories on a monthly basis. We already have clothing items, racks and displays. The clothing will be given based on need while they last and are listed below! We have new and gently used fashionable clothing available for mainly Middle School to College students and some Big & Tall! We have the latest style clothing and accessories of ALL types: footwear; eye wear; sports gear; weight training equipment and accessories; swimwear and swim equipment and accessories; electronics; toiletries; health and beauty products, equipment and accessories; hair care products, equipment and accessories; and much more! Just complete the request form below for consideration!
If you have a venue or know of one, please do not hesitate to contact us immediately!
Jalil
Call or text (510) 394-4101